Latest News – Business Aviation News https://businessaviationnews.com Sun, 07 Aug 2022 16:05:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://businessaviationnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/bizicon-150x150.png Latest News – Business Aviation News https://businessaviationnews.com 32 32 Atlantic Aviation opens US CBP facility at Waterbury-Oxford Airport FBO | CAPA – CAPA – Centre for Aviation https://businessaviationnews.com/atlantic-aviation-opens-us-cbp-facility-at-waterbury-oxford-airport-fbo-capa-capa-centre-for-aviation/ https://businessaviationnews.com/atlantic-aviation-opens-us-cbp-facility-at-waterbury-oxford-airport-fbo-capa-capa-centre-for-aviation/#respond Fri, 05 Aug 2022 04:31:07 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1520800 CAPA publishes more than 1,000 global News Briefs every week, covering all aspects of the aviation and travel industry. It’s the most comprehensive source of market intelligence in the world, with around 50 per cent of content translated from non-English sources. The breadth of our coverage means you won’t need any other news sources to monitor competitors and stay informed about the latest developments in the wider aviation sector.

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ABS Jets: Veni, Vidi, and Arriving at LABACE 2022 – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/abs-jets-veni-vidi-and-arriving-at-labace-2022-aviation-international-news/ https://businessaviationnews.com/abs-jets-veni-vidi-and-arriving-at-labace-2022-aviation-international-news/#respond Thu, 04 Aug 2022 20:47:58 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1518696 Prague-based MRO and charter operator ABS Jets has thrice been to LABACE as a visitor, taking the opportunity the fair presents to connect with Brazilian customers for which it provides trip planning and support to Europe and other locations. Having come and seen, ABS Jets has jumped in with both feet in 2022, not only exhibiting (Booth 1006), but becoming a member of ABAG, the Brazilian Association for General Aviation, which organizes the show, and works year-round for the sector.

“We have previously visited [LABACE] and it definitely is the place to be,” said ABS marketing manager Petr Wessnitzer. “Being located far away from the market in the middle of Europe means we have to travel on a frequent basis to Brazil to meet and take care of our customers. LABACE is a chance to meet many of them in a short time. Even though ABS Jets provides a broad [range] of services…our main focus for LABACE will be flight support.”

ABS Jets’s Brazilian connection goes back to at least 2004 when it began operating Embraer Legacy jets at Václav Havel Airport in Prague. Its FBO there was in 2021 the first in Europe to be awarded Stage 3 registration under IBAC’s International Standard for Business Aviation Handling (IS-BAH). The company has grown to more than 250 people and added a base at M.R. Štefánik Airport in Bratislava. ABS Jets specializes in aircraft management, rental, maintenance, handling, flight planning, and hangarage, and it provides MRO services for the Embraer Legacy and Phenom families in Prague.

Wessnitzer said the company’s connection to South America strengthened as it “gradually continued to provide flight support to the [Embraer] factory, then focusing on other individual clients in Brazil as well.” The support to Embraer was “basically the flight support and logistics behind their executive jets demonstration fleet missions around the globe.

“Demand is typically connected to complicated and long-haul missions far away from the continent. Special events such as the Olympic Games or [Soccer World Cup] mean we always have something demanding to work on.” ABS reps at LABACE 2019 said that the 2018 World Cup in Russia meant 100 flights from Brazil alone. They also mentioned arranging flight support for a Legacy owned by an unidentified Central American president.

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Colfax County Looking for Airport Operator – KRTN Enchanted Air Radio – KRTN Radio https://businessaviationnews.com/colfax-county-looking-for-airport-operator-krtn-enchanted-air-radio-krtn-radio/ https://businessaviationnews.com/colfax-county-looking-for-airport-operator-krtn-enchanted-air-radio-krtn-radio/#respond Thu, 04 Aug 2022 19:52:30 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1517496 Office of the County Manager

August 3, 2022

Press Release

Colfax County has recently published a Request for Proposal, (RFP) for the county-owned and operated airport at Angel Fire. This action is being taken to address the continued annual deficit faced by the airport. Colfax County acquired the airport in 1983. The airport has not generated a positive cash flow, or been profitable, in almost 40 years of operation. It is time to try something different.

In airport operation efforts, Colfax County has worked in partnership with the FAA and NMDOT Aviation Division, to secure grants to maintain airport operations, at the cost of millions of dollars. The grants that have been secured have reporting and expenditure requirements attached to them that, unfortunately, have not been met. Some of these grants are nearing their expiration dates, and require an immediate response.

Infrastructure and safety concerns addressed in the April 24, 2022 inspection report have brought additional urgent needs to light. The current County Manager is increasing grant requests to provide for the total replacement of runway lighting and other public safety/infrastructure requirements.

We believe through a business partnership model we could achieve improved, more efficient operations. The RFP invites partners to respond to our request to operate the airport. Initiating active marketing concepts would be anticipated to generate business for the Angel Fire/Eagle Nest communities. It is our belief that this could grow the airport and be very positive for economic development in the area.

For clarity and transparency, the airport financial report and the latest inspection report are attached.

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COLFAX COUNTY AIRPORT AT ANGEL FIRE
HISTORY OF REVENUES & EXPENDITURES (1983 – 2022)

FAA & State Grants FAA State Match County Match
1983 – Acq. Land, construct runway & taxiway 155,340.00 1,553,400.00 Complete
1985 – Rehab taxiway, extend runway 61,600.50 616,005.00 Complete
1986 – Improve access road, rehab taxiway, construct apron 57,574.80 575,748.00 Complete
1987 – Rehab taxiway, install lighting, acq snow removal equip 36,244.40 362,444.00 Complete
1990 – Rehab runway 88,963.10 889,631.00 Complete
1992 – Rehab runway 82,097.60 820,976.00 Complete
1995 – Rehap Apron 65,117.10 651,171.00 Complete
1997 – Install lighting, navaids and PLASI system 110,207.00 189,295.00 110,208.00 Complete
1997 – Rehab taxiway, complete lighting project 75,227.10 752,271.00 Complete
1999 – Rehab taxiway 13,672.60 136,726.00 Complete
2002 – Acquire snow removal equipment 13,672.60 136,726.00 Complete
2003 – Rehab runway 30,083.00 570,000.00 33,250.00 Complete
2006 – Action Plan, storm water pollution prevention plan 44,400.00 – 1,600.00 Complete
2007 – Rehab apron, NADIN Interface for AWOS, fencing 15,924.00 605,100.00 15,924.00 Complete
2008 – Mowing equipment 30,000.00 30,000.00 Complete
2009 – Install perimeter fence, acquire snow removal equip 7,097.00 245,295.00 6,058.00 Complete
2010 – Install game fence, design taxiway edge drains 26,928.63 359,433.00 26,928.63 Complete
2011 – Airfield maint items, design taxilanes and runway reconstruction 134,813.00 – 14,979.00 Complete
2012 – Airfield maint items, design/construct fuel farm 269,836.00 – 65,264.00 Complete
2013 – Construct taxilanes for hangar area, action plan, edge drainage, etc. 1,252,164.00 1,741,950.00 317,764.00 Complete
2014 – Annual maintenance grant 4,980.00 – 553.00 Complete
2015 – Annual maintenance grant, reconstruct access road, rehab apron 662,500.00 – 73,611.00 Complete
2016-Design and construct taxiway edge drainage system 42,500.00 382,500.00 Complete
2016-Annual maintenance grant 10,000.00 – 1,111.00 Complete
2017-Annual maintenance grant 1,111.00 10,000.00 Complete
2018-Annual maintenance grant 1,111.00 10,000.00 Complete
2019-Annual maintenance grant 1,111.00 10,000.00 Complete
2019-NMDOT Rehab Apon Lighting & Security Cameras 2,322.00 20,900.00 Complete
2019-NMDOT AWOS Update and Repair 4,985.00 44,866.00 Complete
2019-Rehabilitate Taxiway Complete 275,097.00
Airfield Pavement Rehabilitation 15,284.00 15,284.00
2020-Airfield Maintenace and Consumable Items 2,222.00 20,000.00 Incomplete Expires 08/28/2022 No Activity
2020 Runway Pavement Surface/Pavement Joints Incomplete Expires 09/15/2024 $221,087.00 Balance 362,382.00
2020-Construct-Hangars Incomplete Expires 01/16/2023 No Activity 333,000.00
2020-CARES ACT FUND Incomplete No Activity 22,000.00
2022-100LL Fuel Truck Incomplete Expires 03/24/2024 No Activity 126,000.00
2022-Fuel Dispenser Shelter Incomplete Expires 03/24/2024 No Activity 50,000.00
TOTAL FAA & State Grants 10,865,650.00 3,621,482.63 1,417,406.43
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
FBO/Terminal Bldg Purchase – December 2012 411,225.54 $
Cattleguard Installation – November 2012 10,046.25
Airport Sign – October 2015 4,660.69
Window Installation-June 2016 195,757.64
Crack, Seal, Stripping -Nov 2019 13,861.30
Painting (Colfax Lodger’s Tax) 19,257.20
TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES $ 654,808.62
AIRPORT OPERATIONS 2011-2019 Revenues Expenditures Variance
FY 11/12 62,210.00 $ 218,802.82 $ (156,592.82) $
FY 12/13 172,362.00 328,582.91 (156,220.91)
FY 13/14 77,967.00 189,199.26 (111,232.26)
FY 14/15 159,857.89 217,809.24 (57,951.35)
FY 15/16 160,653.79 196,792.82 (36,139.03)
FY 16/17 84,831.14 211,225.74 (126,394.60)
FY 17/18 118,623.26 204,655.07 (86,031.81)
FY 18/19 149,181.55 216,980.64 (67,799.09)
FY 19/20 166,905.14 235,959.04 (69,053.90)
FY 20/21 197,162.47 274,189.07 (77,026.60)
FY 21/22 329,396.62 423,679.86 (94,283.24)
TOTAL AIRPORT OPERATIONS 633,050.68 $ 1,151,187.05 $ (518,136.37)

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Super Bowl LVII – Airport – City of Scottsdale https://businessaviationnews.com/super-bowl-lvii-airport-city-of-scottsdale/ https://businessaviationnews.com/super-bowl-lvii-airport-city-of-scottsdale/#respond Thu, 04 Aug 2022 15:17:56 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1516262 To view the site or page in another language, adjust your browser language settings for the language you prefer to use. Check your browser’s help section for instructions on how to change the language. Here are
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ExecuJet to open FBO at Dubai Al Maktoum International Airport – Business Airport International https://businessaviationnews.com/execujet-to-open-fbo-at-dubai-al-maktoum-international-airport-business-airport-international/ https://businessaviationnews.com/execujet-to-open-fbo-at-dubai-al-maktoum-international-airport-business-airport-international/#respond Thu, 04 Aug 2022 14:32:47 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1515760

ExecuJet, part of Luxaviation Group, is opening an FBO facility at Dubai Al Maktoum International Airport.

The FBO will feature a presidential suite, double-story crew lounge with viewing deck and games room, airside hotel room suite, transit lounge smoking area and bar. The terminal will also have discrete working and rest areas with landside access for both passengers and crew, with a duty-free shop, complimentary Wi-Fi, prayer rooms, television, refreshments, newspapers and magazines. The facility will have 33,000 sqm of modern FBO amenities over three floors.

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Sari Sawaya, vice president, ExecuJet Middle East said, “The team are working hard to ensure that the FBO is ready by the beginning of 2023 and we’re counting down the days until we can unveil our brand-new facility to the world.

“At ExecuJet, customer service is at the core of everything we do, and we pride ourselves on delivering excellence in a comprehensive range of business aviation services. Our new aviation mega-structure will enable us to expand on our current customer service offering and provide the best experience possible. This expansion is key for the growth ambitions of ExecuJet Middle East and builds upon our current two facilities at Dubai International Airport and Al Maktoum International Airport.”

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Personal Weather Minimums: Identify Yours – FLYING https://businessaviationnews.com/personal-weather-minimums-identify-yours-flying/ https://businessaviationnews.com/personal-weather-minimums-identify-yours-flying/#respond Thu, 04 Aug 2022 12:42:47 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1507767 There’s good reason why flight instructors place weather limitations in a student pilot’s logbook. These limitations must be in place because most student pilots don’t have the experience to determine where their skill ends and luck begins. Once you’ve earned your sport or private pilot certificate, it’s your responsibility to establish your personal weather limitations—and abide by them on every flight.

The purpose of having personal limitations is to mitigate risk. Personal limitations are predicated on pilot experience level, familiarity with the airplane, knowledge of the area, the weather, and the nature of the mission. They cover much more than just weather considerations.

IMSAFE and PAVE

As a student pilot, you learned about the “Swiss cheese model” that results in accidents. When all the risks line up—the holes in the cheese—accidents happen. The FAA has provided pilots with checklist tools (IMSAFE and PAVE) to help identify and assess risk before each flight.

IMSAFE guides the pilot to check if they are affected by illness, medication, stress, alcohol, fatigue, and/or emotion and eating. PAVE prompts the pilot to consider: pilot currency/skills, airplane condition, en-Vironment (includes weather), and external pressures.

If anything pops up for you when you run through either checklist, identify the risks, and ask yourself if they can be safely mitigated.

Not feeling well? Fatigued? Emotionally distracted? Reschedule the flight.

Is the No. 1 VOR in the aircraft in need of a VOR check? Do you need it for the flight? If the answer is yes, could you take care of it?

How is the weather? Will it be a challenge? Could you reschedule for later in the day after the weather improves?

Thunderstorms in the region in which you plan to fly should give pilots pause. If storms fall in a line, passing through that line requires a 40 nm gap between cells—in order to make a safe transit, according to the author. [Photo: Adobe Stock]

Proficiency and Currency

One of the first things an aviator learns is that there is a big difference between FAA-defined currency and pilot proficiency. Often it’s the lack of proficiency that gets pilots into trouble—sometimes when they have non-pilot passengers on board.

Although three takeoffs and landings within 90 days make you current according to FAA regulations, you may want to impose a personal limit, such as, “I will not fly with passengers or in marginal VFR unless I’ve flown within the preceding two weeks,” or “If it’s been more than 60 days, I will remain in the pattern for X number of touch and gos before I depart the area.”

Personal weather limitations can be the most challenging for the newly-minted VFR-only pilot, and you may want to adjust them for passengers. For example, you might set yours as the following: “I can fly when the ceiling is at least 1,000 feet and visibility is at least three miles; but if I have a passenger, I will not fly unless the ceiling is at least 1,500 feet and visibility is at least four miles.”

Most pilots take great pride in their skills, and some go so far as to write down a commitment to maintaining proficiency and currency, noting, “I will make an effort to fly at least three times a month, for at least two hours.” This is followed by a plan to remedy the situation if they cannot keep the commitment, such as “If it has been more than 45 days since I have flown, I will take a qualified instructor with me.”

Many FBOs have a policy like this written into their rental agreements. For example, some require that if you have not flown one of their aircraft in the preceding 90 days, you must fly with an instructor.

SCENARIO 1: WHEN THE WEATHER IS BELOW YOUR PERSONAL WEATHER LIMITATIONS

THE WEATHER IS MARGINAL VFR and it is late afternoon. You’re a VFR pilot on day 86 of the 90-day currency cycle, so you rush out to the airport to get in three takeoffs and landings. In two days’ time you have promised to take your boss’s kid for a flight. You have a little more than an hour before sunset, and you are not night current. The winds are calm. As you turn on to downwind, you notice fog is starting to appear about three miles off the departure end of the runway. What are your options?

• You could rush to try to get those three takeoffs and landings in before the fog gets worse.
• You could make a full-stop landing and finish your currency flying tomorrow.

In the time it took you to read that last sentence, you probably identified the risks: a rushed and rusty pilot rushing the pattern leads to a rushed landing, and those elements can put you behind the airplane.

What would you do? You know from training and experience that three touch-and-gos usually take about a half an hour to complete. In theory, there’s time to get them all done. Do you feel confident in your ability to safely finish the currency flight, or would you feel better trying tomorrow? What is the worst that could happen? Is this flight worth the risk?

Higher Workload? Increase Limits

Flying in an unfamiliar airplane is like cooking in someone else’s kitchen—it can be disastrous if you don’t know where everything is or how it works. When you are flying a new-to-you airplane, raise your minimums. Even if you are instrument rated, you may want to keep the first flight in a new-to-you airplane in VFR conditions, especially when you are learning the panel or avionics suite. If the purpose of the flight is transition training to a faster or more complex aircraft, you may want to stay in VFR conditions so you don’t unnecessarily add to your workload and increase the learning curve.

Limits for Passenger Flights

You may not have any qualms about a few bumps or gusty crosswinds, but your passengers could have other ideas. Both can be terror- and vomit-inducing for the aviation challenged.

If you’re an instructor and you conduct an introductory or primary training flight, you probably have limitations set by the school or FBO (or their insurance company). You also have to ask yourself, “Would I want the learner to fly in this by him or herself?” It is up to instructors to model good risk management. There’s a time and place for challenging weather—but you want them to learn, not be intimidated.

Unfamiliar Terrain

If you are unfamiliar with the area you are flying in, raise the weather limitations—this is the enVironment part of PAVE. If you are a “flat-land” pilot and your normal VFR limitations are three miles visibility and a 1,000-foot ceiling, but you’re flying in mountainous regions, raise those limitations to five miles visibility and a 2,500-foot ceiling—especially if up until then you have only read about mountain flying.

If it is a new-to-you area, study the sectional chart ahead of time, in particular noting the VFR reporting points, visual landmarks, and pattern altitudes. You do not want to be heads down with the iPad or sectional while approaching the pattern to land. You should also seek out mountain-specific instruction from an experienced pilot before you go it alone over high-altitude and mountainous terrain for the first time.

SCENARIO 2: RENTING AN AIRCRAFT WHILE ON VACATION 

KEEP YOUR EXPECTATIONS in check if you want to rent an airplane while on vacation. It is not like renting a car where you show your driver’s license, give them a credit card, and off you go. Most FBOs will want to see your pilot and medical certificates, give you an open-book test, and then have you do a flight with one of their CFIs before they rent to you. The checkout can run the better part of two hours. Know this before you go into the situation so you don’t feel pressured to cut corners to “get it done.”

One of the challenging aspects of this situation is that you probably don’t know anything about the FBO’s maintenance. You can, however, ask to see the airplane’s logbooks. Pay attention to the details. If the FBO smells like a fish tank or an ashtray, the CFI you are supposed to fly with shows up in dirty jeans and a T-shirt, and the aircraft looks about as rough as it can be, ask yourself if you really want to fly there. Even if they claim to be the “only game in town,” ask yourself if it’s worth the risk.

Remember, it just takes two holes to line up in the Swiss cheese to give you a bad day.

Avoid ‘Get-It-Done-Itis’

“Get-it-done-itis”—the close cousin to the deadly “get-there-itis”—can trigger poor decision making. Just about every airport has a story about a VFR-only pilot in a VFR-only airplane who did a scud run in his personal aircraft to get to the airport for a walk-in flight review.

Scud running is dangerous business. [Photo: Adobe Stock]

In one example: It was the end of the month and the pilot insisted that it had to be done today, because the aircraft was going in for annual and it had been 23 calendar months since his last flight review. The pilot flew in from his grass strip about five miles from the airport. His assessment of the weather was, “it looked pretty good,” but after some questioning from the CFI, he admitted he had made the flight at 500 feet agl to avoid the clouds. He estimated the inflight visibility to be about two miles. He told the CFI that normally he would not fly unless he had at least a 1,000-foot ceiling and three miles visibility, but he “really, really, really needed to get this done.”

The CFI asked the pilot about his personal weather limitations. Was he comfortable during the flight? Would he have brought a passenger with him? The answer was “no” to both questions—settling the matter—that in making the flight, he broke his own parameters.

SCENARIO 3: THUNDERSTORMS: HOW CLOSE DO YOU GO? 

ANOTHER TYPE OF WEATHER limitation strikes when thunderstorms boil up in the region in which you plan to fly. Most pilots have heard a common safety rule: Stay clear of any storm by at least 20 nm. If storms fall in a line, passing through that line then requires you to have a 40 nm gap between cells in order to make a safe transit.

This is probably one of the most readily “busted” weather limits out there, as pilots commonly fudge that distance by half. They get away with it—for a while.

And then, inevitably, they find there’s a good reason for the safety margin. That’s because cells often generate severe turbulence and toss out precipitation far from their primary visible cloud formations.

This is one personal limit you don’t want to bust.

This article was first published in the Q2 2022 edition of FLYING Magazine.

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SFS FBO at Vail Eagle County Regional Airport reaches Tier 3 NATA sustainability certification | CAPA – CAPA – Centre for Aviation https://businessaviationnews.com/sfs-fbo-at-vail-eagle-county-regional-airport-reaches-tier-3-nata-sustainability-certification-capa-capa-centre-for-aviation/ https://businessaviationnews.com/sfs-fbo-at-vail-eagle-county-regional-airport-reaches-tier-3-nata-sustainability-certification-capa-capa-centre-for-aviation/#respond Thu, 04 Aug 2022 04:58:29 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1514701 CAPA publishes more than 1,000 global News Briefs every week, covering all aspects of the aviation and travel industry. It’s the most comprehensive source of market intelligence in the world, with around 50 per cent of content translated from non-English sources. The breadth of our coverage means you won’t need any other news sources to monitor competitors and stay informed about the latest developments in the wider aviation sector.

Become a CAPA Member

Our daily News Briefs are only available to CAPA Members. Membership provides access to more than 1,000 News Briefs every week, with quick links to our Analysis Reports, Research Publications, Data Centre and more.

It’s easy to keep your News Briefs relevant by customising your email alerts based on topic, region, sector, frequency and more. Once you’ve saved your settings, you can stay up-to-date wherever you are, by quickly scanning our News Briefs online or via the CAPA mobile app.

Membership also provides full access to our Analysis Reports, in-depth Research Publications and comprehensive Data Centre. Premium CAPA Members can also access add-ons such as our exclusive Fleet Database, Airline Cask Data tools and more, to enjoy the full capabilities of our global platform.

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Signature Location Earns 1st NATA Sustainability Tier 3 Nod – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/signature-location-earns-1st-nata-sustainability-tier-3-nod-aviation-international-news/ https://businessaviationnews.com/signature-location-earns-1st-nata-sustainability-tier-3-nod-aviation-international-news/#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2022 19:44:44 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1514172

Signature Flight Support’s Vail Valley Jet Center at Colorado’s Eagle Regional Airport is the first to achieve Tier 3 in NATA’s Sustainability Standard for Aviation Businesses. The free, voluntary initiative, developed by a working group under NATA’s environment committee, was launched last November to provide FBOs and other industry operators with a self-certification process for pursuing flexible, cost-effective options to lower their carbon footprint.

Each level of the program builds on the previous tier’s guidelines, starting with the initial Green Aviation Business designation which includes a checklist of mandatory features. Further improvements include the installation of low-flow plumbing fixtures, implementation of a sustainable sourcing/procurement policy, adoption of electrically-powered ground handling equipment and vehicles, and upgrade of lighting to energy-efficient LEDs.

“As Signature’s Vail Valley Jet Center ascends to NATA’s Tier 3 Green Aviation Business certification, we’re delighted to be driving real environmental impacts in the Colorado Rocky Mountains,” said Jovan Phillips, product manager for Signature Renew, the company’s sustainability initiative. “Signature has set the industry template for green FBO facility design, which includes 13 solar-powered FBOs and 29 LEED construction projects completed to date, and we’re proud to be recognized by NATA for achieving this exceedingly high standard.”

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Phase 2 of Arizona Mega Hangar Complex Set to Open – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/phase-2-of-arizona-mega-hangar-complex-set-to-open-aviation-international-news/ https://businessaviationnews.com/phase-2-of-arizona-mega-hangar-complex-set-to-open-aviation-international-news/#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1511209 California-based Davcon Construction is expected to complete Phase 2 of its private hangar project at Mesa, Arizona’s Falcon Field Airport next month. Construction on the complex, which can accommodate the latest ultra-long-range business jets, began in March 2020, with fully-occupied Phase 1 opening last August.

The two phases, which were constructed at the cost of $70 million, consist of 350,000-sq-ft of turnkey hangars ranging from 3,700 sq ft to 15,000 in either a wholly-occupied or shared format, plus an additional 50,000 sq ft of Class A business space. Phases 3 and 4, which will double the development cost, are slated to come online in Q3 of 2023 adding a further 250,000 sq ft of hangar, retail, and Class A office space.

According to Davcon president David Wakefield, the hangars are some of the first of their kind, incorporating solar and batteries within the design along with a number of other efficiencies. The unique design and execution of this project led to the facility winning an energy star quality achievement award.  

Ground handling services for the hangar tenants are provided by the Avflight FBO which opened last year as part of the complex.

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Elliott Aviation Completes Acquisition of Four Points Aero Services – Business Wire https://businessaviationnews.com/elliott-aviation-completes-acquisition-of-four-points-aero-services-business-wire/ https://businessaviationnews.com/elliott-aviation-completes-acquisition-of-four-points-aero-services-business-wire/#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1509651

MOLINE, Ill. & DALLAS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Elliott Aviation (“Elliott”), a portfolio company of Summit Park, is pleased to announce that it has completed the acquisition of Four Points Aero Services (“FPA” or “the Company”), a full-service aircraft repair facility based in Dallas, Texas that provides full maintenance, repair, and overhaul services (MRO) and other MRO support services for a broad variety of corporate and general aviation aircraft.

Located at Dallas Love Field (“DAL”), FPA specializes in airframe and avionics maintenance and repair services. The Company has built a strong reputation for its technical repair capabilities and performs its services on a variety of turbine aircraft, including Beechcraft, Cessna Citation, Embraer, Falcon, and Hawker, among others.

Elliott provides a diverse suite of services to the business aviation industry, including MRO, fixed base operations (“FBO”), and new and used aircraft sales and brokerage. The Company is headquartered at the Quad Cities Airport in Moline, Illinois and operates additional facilities in Eden Prairie, MN, Des Moines, IA, and Atlanta, GA. Summit Park invested in Elliott in January 2020, and FPA marks the second add-on acquisition for the platform.

Greg Sahr, President of Elliott, said, “It is a pleasure to welcome Four Points to the Elliott Aviation family. We’re excited at the growth prospects for the company and look forward to building upon the impressive legacy built by its employees.”

Stephen Stites, Vice President at Summit Park, added, “Adding a Texas-based MRO location to the Elliott footprint has been part of our strategy from the outset of our investment. We’re thrilled to have the capability to extend Elliott’s industry leading customer service to countless past and future customers in the region.”

About Elliott Aviation

Elliott Aviation has been developing and delivering aviation solutions to its partners for over 80 years. As one of the longest-standing companies in aviation, the Company offers a complete menu of high-quality products and services including aircraft sales (as Elliott Jets), avionics service and installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair and overhaul, paint, and interior. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, Elliott has facilities in Atlanta, GA, Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, Minneapolis, MN, and Dallas, TX. The Company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and the International Aircraft Dealers Association (IADA). For more information, visit www.elliottaviation.com.

About Summit Park

Summit Park is a Charlotte, North Carolina-based private investment firm focused exclusively on the lower middle market. The firm invests across a range of industries, including services, consumer, and industrial growth. The firm’s capital can be used to facilitate a change in ownership, to support expansion and growth, to provide partial liquidity to existing owners, or to support an industry consolidation plan. For more information, visit www.summitparkllc.com.

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Two Dassault Aviation FBOs Take Top Spots in Survey – AviationSource News https://businessaviationnews.com/two-dassault-aviation-fbos-take-top-spots-in-survey-aviationsource-news/ https://businessaviationnews.com/two-dassault-aviation-fbos-take-top-spots-in-survey-aviationsource-news/#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2022 11:58:08 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1509123 LONDON – Dassault Aviation’s Fixed Based Operation (FBO) at Geneva International Airport, has been voted top FBO by the European business aircraft operators’ survey performed by Business Air News.

Moreover, the magazine also ranked Dassault’s Le Bourget FBO number two among operators at Paris-Le Bourget Airport. Similar to Geneva, is one of the most utilised airports with a large private jet compliment. The awards highlights the dedication and customer service from the Dassault Falcon FBOs. 

After they have ranked all FBOs in the continent, Dassault’s Geneva operation came third whilst Paris-Le Bourget came in sixth. 

This is a major milestone for Dassault, as Geneva is Europe’s third destination for business aviation, and has 5 different FBOs located there. Paris Le Bourget is even more significant, and is ranked as Europe’s number one business aviation destination in the continent with at least 8 FBOs! 

Jean Kayanakis, SVP Worldwide Falcon Customer Service & Service Center Network, said: “We think of the service we provide in the most expansive terms. That means providing a welcoming environment and top service quality for pilots and passengers alike, whatever the brand of business aircraft they fly.” 

FBOs at both Geneva and Le Bourget are key strategic locations. Moreover, the FBOs are also co-operated by a major maintenance service centre, which is Dassault Falcon Service at Le Bourget and TAG Maintenance Services (TMS) in Geneva.

Both centres are led by experienced veterans in the aviation industry and always emphasize the quality of service, perfection and customer orientation. TMS, being a well-known maintenance company does service such as aircraft maintenance including D-Checks, in which each facility are ready to host services for aircraft crew and flight handling. 

Photo: Dassault Aviation

Both centres will not let their customers down after they have completed renovations and added extra capabilities, including capacities. TMS Geneva also welcomed its other terminal on the south apron of Geneva Cointrin Airport for better convenience.

The expansion also comes with sustainability in mind, introducing the airport’s first electric ground power unit (eGPU). The state-of-the-art ground unit is carbon neutral, environmentally friendly, and quiet.

This is one of the first moves by a European MRO to provide electric GPUs. GPUs surprisingly comprise about 40% of greenhouse gas emissions from all of the airport ground equipment. 

Dassault’s facility at Le Bourget has shown and proven that running on 100% SAF (Sustainability Aviation Fuel), with the assistance of TotalEnergies, is economically viable. Its Paris-based facility also achieved Stage 2 certification for its ground handling operations by International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling (IS-BAH).

This achievement is being also awarded to Dassault for upholding safety and efficiency standards of business and ground handling of general aviation at airports.

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Atlantic Aviation acquires Blue Heron Aviation FBO at Providenciales International Airport | CAPA – CAPA – Centre for Aviation https://businessaviationnews.com/atlantic-aviation-acquires-blue-heron-aviation-fbo-at-providenciales-international-airport-capa-capa-centre-for-aviation/ https://businessaviationnews.com/atlantic-aviation-acquires-blue-heron-aviation-fbo-at-providenciales-international-airport-capa-capa-centre-for-aviation/#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2022 04:58:25 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1509127 CAPA publishes more than 1,000 global News Briefs every week, covering all aspects of the aviation and travel industry. It’s the most comprehensive source of market intelligence in the world, with around 50 per cent of content translated from non-English sources. The breadth of our coverage means you won’t need any other news sources to monitor competitors and stay informed about the latest developments in the wider aviation sector.

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TxDOT Funded Project Nears Completion – Seminole Sentinel https://businessaviationnews.com/txdot-funded-project-nears-completion-seminole-sentinel/ https://businessaviationnews.com/txdot-funded-project-nears-completion-seminole-sentinel/#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2022 00:43:02 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1508334

Construction is nearly completed on the $800,000 state-funded fence project enclosing 400 acres at the Gaines County Airport. The fence is being paid for entirely by a TxDOT grant and at no expense to the County, stressed Fixed Base Operator (FBO) Jonathan Siemons. Gaines County Commissioner David Murphree said the County submitted a grant application to TxDOT, and the project was deemed…

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Contractor flying high after securing airport hangar contract – Project Scotland https://businessaviationnews.com/contractor-flying-high-after-securing-airport-hangar-contract-project-scotland/ https://businessaviationnews.com/contractor-flying-high-after-securing-airport-hangar-contract-project-scotland/#respond Tue, 02 Aug 2022 08:14:19 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526126

MCLAUGHLIN & Harvey has secured a contract for the design and construction of a new hangar at Farnborough Airport.

Work on the hangar, which represents the largest infrastructure project at the airport this century, is due to start in the coming weeks whilst the airport remains fully operational.

McLaughlin & Harvey construction director, Douglas McCusker, said, “McLaughlin & Harvey is proud to have been selected as design and build partner for the construction of the new hanger facilities. We will draw on our previous experience of working in a live airport environment, to ensure that construction doesn’t impact the day to day activities at Farnborough Airport.

“Successful delivery of the project will draw upon our wealth of experience in both the industrial and infrastructure sectors and we look forward to working with the client, design team and our supply chain partners for what is sure to be a flagship development for all involved.”

Development of the airport – named Europe’s best Fixed-Based Operator (FBO) since 2005 – will increase the hangar space available with the construction of an additional large span portal building with concrete floors, associated airport apron works and hangar doors.

Simon Geere, Farnborough Airport’s CEO, commented, “We are pleased to announce that we have appointed McLaughlin & Harvey and Gebler Tooth on the development of Domus III, which will further enhance our facilities and operational infrastructure. We want to be known as a global showcase for airport sustainability and the new hangar has been meticulously designed with this in mind.”

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Continuation bias factor in Boeing 737-700 runway excursion at Burbank Airport https://businessaviationnews.com/continuation-bias-factor-in-boeing-737-700-runway-excursion-at-burbank-airport/ https://businessaviationnews.com/continuation-bias-factor-in-boeing-737-700-runway-excursion-at-burbank-airport/#respond Fri, 29 Jul 2022 14:18:16 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1467034

Southwest Airlines (SWA) flight 278 was en route to Bob Hope Airport (BUR), Burbank, California, when it overran the end of runway 8. The airplane came to rest about 144 ft past the departure end of runway and 71 ft into an engineered materials arresting system. Shortly before the airplane touched down on the runway, the tower controller informed the flight crew that heavy precipitation was occurring directly over the airport and that the wind was from 270° at 11 knots. BUR runway 8, which was 5,802 ft in length, was one of the shortest runways at airports where SWA operated.

Before the airplane reached the top of descent (about 0839), the flight crew requested and received a landing data report generated from the SWA performance weight and balance (PWB) system. The report indicated that maximum autobrakes should be used for landing on runway 8 and that the stopping margin—that is, the difference between the calculated landing distance (including a 15% safety factor) and the runway length available—would be 245 ft. The PWB system calculations assumed that touchdown would occur 1,500 ft from the runway threshold and that the wind would be from about 280° at 5 knots (the wind direction and speed at the time of the airport’s 0753 weather observation converted from true north to magnetic north). Both flight crewmembers expressed concern about the stopping distance given the wet runway, the tailwind that would be present, and the runway length, and they discussed that the braking action upon touchdown would need to be “pretty abrupt.” Also, even though the first officer stated, during a postincident interview, that BUR “always has a low number” for the stopping margin, the captain stated that he had not previously seen a stopping margin as low as the one for the incident flight.

While the airplane was descending through the terminal area, the controller advised the flight crew that the pilot of a King Air airplane reported a 15-knot loss of airspeed on final approach to BUR and that a corporate jet had just conducted a go-around at BUR because of the wind.

However, after the tower controller cleared the airplane to land, the controller advised the flight crew that a pilot of a Boeing 737 airplane had reported braking action as “good” 10 minutes earlier.

Shortly before landing, the tower controller reported that the wind was from 270° at 10 knots and then, less than 1 minute later, from 270° at 11 knots, The SWA B737NG Aircraft Operating Manual (AOM) stated that the tailwind limit for landing was 10 knots. After the second wind report, the first officer stated, “we got eleven knots. You want to call it good?” The captain replied, “yeah.” During a postincident interview, the captain stated that both he and the first officer assumed that the tailwind component would be about 9 to 10 knots (presumably because the wind would not be directly behind the airplane given the wind direction and the orientation of the runway).

The SWA 737 AOM also stated that, for tailwind landings, the target speed should be the reference landing speed (Vref) plus 5 knots. The PWB system determined that the Vref for the flight would be 126 knots, so the target speed should have been 131 knots. However, the aircraft performance study for this incident determined that the airplane’s airspeed over the runway threshold was 137 knots. Also, the true airspeed and groundspeed (based on flight data recorder data) showed that a tailwind of 13 to 18 knots was over the runway at that time and not the 5-knot tailwind that the PWB system calculations assumed.

Further, the aircraft performance study found that the airplane touched down about 2,500 ft past the runway threshold, which was 1,000 ft beyond the 1,500-ft touchdown point assumed in the PWB system calculations. This study finding was consistent with a BUR tower controller’s observation of the airplane touching down near the intersection of taxiway D7 and runway 8, which was about 2,600 ft from the runway threshold.

The AOM stated that, if an airplane were to touch down beyond the 1,500-ft point, the stopping margin that the PWB system calculated would be “invalid” and that, in some cases, the runway length would be “insufficient” for the airplane to stop. In this case, the longer-than-normal touchdown point, the higher-than-expected tailwind, and the faster-than-nominal approach speed increased the airplane’s required landing distance, making the 245-ft stopping margin calculation invalid.

The AOM also stated that, if the current weather conditions are significantly different than the anticipated conditions at the time of the PWB system calculations, higher-than-planned braking might be needed to account for the reduced or insufficient stopping margin. Flight data recorder data showed that the airplane’s autobrakes were activated at touchdown but then disengaged almost immediately as a result of pilot-applied pressure to the brake pedals. The maximum left and right wheel brake pressure (indicating full manual braking) was reached about 6 seconds after touchdown and remained at maximum until 1 second before the airplane came to rest.

During a postincident interview, the captain stated that he was “blending in manual brakes” because the airplane was not slowing with maximum autobrakes. However, the captain’s application of manual brakes almost immediately after touchdown was contrary to company guidance, which stated that “the intent of using the autobrake system for landing is to let the system automatically brake the aircraft to an appropriate speed, not to override the system shortly after touchdown” and “once the landing roll is stabilized, transition to manual brakes…with adverse conditions, transition at a slower speed.” According to the aircraft performance study, the maximum braking performance available from the runway was achieved even without proper use of maximum autobrakes.

The airplane initially reached and maintained a deceleration rate between about 0.3 and 0.4 G, but the deceleration rate decreased to between 0.15 and 0.20 G after the airplane crossed over the left edge of the runway from a grooved to a smooth paved surface. (This maneuver is consistent with the captain’s statement about potentially turning onto taxiway D1 and his application of left rudder and the tiller.) The decrease in deceleration is consistent with a lower friction coefficient on the smooth paved surface compared with that on the grooved runway surface. Once the airplane entered the engineered materials arresting system, the deceleration rate increased to a maximum of about 0.6 G until the airplane stopped.

The flight crew had multiple opportunities to assess whether to continue the approach to a landing, but none of those opportunities resulted in a decision to go around. Although the flight crew received automatic terminal information service (ATIS) information Hotel before the airplane reached the top of descent, as required by SWA procedures, the crew failed to consider that the information might no longer be valid after receiving reports of changing weather conditions. Also, when the flight crew received the report from the tower controller indicating that the wind was from 270° at 10 knots, the crew recognized that the tailwind would be at SWA’s limit. Shortly afterward, the crew learned that the wind speed had increased to 11 knots. However, neither of these wind reports led to flight crew recognition that the PWB system-calculated stopping margin was no longer valid. Specifically, the crew did not discuss that the wind in the landing data report (which was issued about 37 minutes earlier) no longer reflected the current wind or that an updated landing data report from the PWB system was needed, thus missing another opportunity to better understand and address the deteriorating weather situation.

Both ATIS information Juliet and Kilo, which became effective about 21 and 9 minutes, respectively, before touchdown, included windshear advisories, and SWA procedures stated that pilots should not continue an approach if known windshear existed. Although the approach controller did not notify the incident flight crew about the more recent ATIS reports, which also discussed the significantly increased (11-knot) tailwind, the crew should have recognized the potential threat for windshear after receiving and acknowledging the reports of an airplane that had a 15-knot loss of airspeed on final approach and an airplane whose pilot conducted a go-around because of wind, and the crew should have discontinued the approach after receiving these reports.

During a postincident interview, the captain stated that pilots could request multiple landing data reports from the PWB system but that the same data might be received if the weather information in the system had not been updated. In this case, the weather information would have been updated because, after the BUR hourly observation at 0753 (which was the basis for the original PWB landing data calculations), two additional weather reports (a special weather observation and an hourly weather observation) were generated at 0841 and 0853, respectively. (These reports became the basis for ATIS information Juliet and Kilo). In addition, the flight crew had the option to manually enter the wind information. With a 10- or an 11-knot tailwind (as reported in the 0841 and 0853 weather observations), updated PWB system calculations would likely have indicated that the airplane could not safely land on runway 8, especially given that the previously calculated stopping margin (when the tailwind was 5 knots) was only 245 ft.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) evaluated why the flight crew continued the approach to a landing. The captain reported that he had flown into BUR between 80 and 100 times. The captain also reported that his previous flights into BUR occurred in visual flight rules flight and without any significant precipitation. The first officer reported that he had flown into BUR at least 100 times and estimated that he encountered a tailwind or rain from 5% to 10% of time. Although the flight crewmembers had experience landing on the short runway, their lack of substantial exposure to adverse weather at the airport resulted in pilot mental models for landing that did not fully account for the environmental challenges that compounded the short runway challenges.

In addition, the flight crew’s decision to continue the approach to a landing was consistent with a psychological concept referred to as plan continuation bias, which is an unconscious cognitive bias to continue with an original plan despite changing conditions. After hearing the wind report indicating an 11-knot tailwind, the flight crew justified continuing the approach, even though the tailwind component would be “right on the edge” of the company’s 10-knot limit. (Specifically, the 270° wind was 10° off from a direct tailwind for runway 8; thus, the 11-knot wind speed would result in a tailwind between 10 and 11 knots.) The crewmembers did not consider taking another action, such as performing a go-around to allow them time to reassess the situation, which would have been consistent with company guidance that instructed pilots to go around if a landing appeared unsafe. Thus, the flight crew’s decision to land on a short runway with the reported 11-knot wind almost directly on the airplane’s tail was intentional due to plan continuation bias, and the decision was inappropriate.

The airplane touched down on the runway 1,000 ft beyond the 1,500-ft touchdown point assumed in the PWB system calculations and specified in SWA procedures. The horizontal distance from the runway threshold that was required for the airplane to descend and touch down was substantially increased by the airplane’s higher-than-anticipated groundspeed. Contributing to the increased groundspeed were the higher-than-expected tailwind and the airplane’s faster-than-nominal approach speed as it crossed the threshold. (The target speed was 131 knots, Vref plus 5 knots. The airplane crossed the threshold at 137 knots, Vref plus 11 knots.) Although the wind and the excess airspeed both contributed to the airplane’s higher groundspeed (which led to the longer-than-normal touchdown), the wind played more of a role than the excess airspeed.

The captain estimated that the airplane touched down between 1,300 and 1,500 ft from the runway threshold. This estimate was based on the expected timing between 10 ft above ground level (when the airplane began to flare) and touchdown and was not based on external cues such as the painted runway markings and relevant taxiway intersections. Also, the first officer was “pretty confident” that the airplane touched down by 1,500 ft. However, the tailwind increased the groundspeed and thus the distance traveled in a given time, causing the airplane to touch down farther on the runway than both flight crewmembers assumed.

The NTSB recognizes that, according to their postincident interviews, both flight crewmembers did not realize that the airplane touched down 2,500 ft from the runway threshold. The captain’s failure to correct the excess approach speed and both flight crewmembers’ lack of awareness of the long touchdown were consistent with the crew experiencing a narrowing of attention. This phenomenon occurs when certain information is overlooked as individuals focus on a narrow field of attention perceived to be the most threatening or salient (in this case, the tailwind and the need for aggressive braking upon touchdown).

The NTSB considered whether the pavement change on the runway (the first 500 ft beyond the runway 8 threshold was constructed of light-colored concrete, and the remainder of the runway was constructed with dark-colored asphalt) created a visual illusion that affected the flight crew’s assessment of where the airplane touched down. Because the captain stated that he was following guidance from the heads-up display and precision approach path indicator lights to the runway, the pavement change was likely not a factor in the crew’s assessment of the touchdown point.

According to the AOM, a go-around should be performed if “the pilot determines that a landing in the touchdown zone cannot be safely accomplished because…the aircraft touches down beyond 1500 ft. with an insufficient PWB System-computed stopping margin.” The AOM also stated that a landing on a runway with a reduced or an insufficient stopping margin “becomes more critical on shorter runways” (such as runway 8 at BUR) and that a go-around would be “the better option” compared with continuing the landing. The crewmembers’ recognition that the airplane had flown beyond the touchdown point would have been another trigger to conduct a go-around and reassess the landing conditions. (SWA procedures allowed flight crews to go around until the thrust reverser levers were raised.)

As previously stated, the flight crew should have recognized that the landing data report that the PWB system calculated (which provided a relatively short stopping margin that concerned the flight crew) might no longer be accurate. Thus, even with the stressful, fast-paced, and dynamic situation that was occurring, the flight crew should have called for and executed a go-around.

After the incident, SWA issued a flight operations bulletin that discussed that company pilots must execute a go-around if an airplane touches down beyond the first one-third of the available runway length, the first 3,000 ft of the available runway length, or 1,500 ft plus the planned PWB system-calculated stopping margin, whichever is the most restrictive. For the incident flight, the first and last criteria would have applied, with the last criterion being the most restrictive because it would have required a go-around for a touchdown occurring at or beyond 1,745 ft—about 760 ft before the touchdown point during the incident landing. (As previously stated, at the time of the incident, SWA required a go-around if landing in the touchdown zone could not be safely accomplished because the airplane touched down beyond 1,500 ft with an insufficient PWB system-computed stopping margin.)

SWA also provided the NTSB with a list (dated June 2020) of other safety improvements that resulted from this incident. However, none of those safety improvements required company flight crews to reassess whether the information in a PWB landing data report remained valid in changing conditions. This incident demonstrated that landing conditions can change during a flight and that the landing data report that a flight crew receives before the top of descent might not be sufficient to ensure a safe stopping distance at the time of arrival. SWA procedures did not specify the conditions that would warrant obtaining updated landing data reports from the PWB system (such as when a controller-reported wind differs significantly from the wind used in a landing data report). In addition, SWA did not instruct its flight crews to verify the PWB system performance data as an airplane gets closer to its destination, which would take little time to accomplish.

Probable Cause:
(1) The flight crewmembers’ decision, due to plan continuation bias, to continue the approach despite indications of windshear and a higher-than-expected tailwind and
(2) the flight crew’s misperception of the airplane’s touchdown point, which was farther down the runway than the crew assumed because of the faster-than-expected groundspeed. Contributing to the accident was Southwest Airlines’ lack of guidance to prompt flight crews to reassess operator-provided landing data when arrival weather conditions differ from those used in the original landing data calculation.

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Busy Virginia General Aviation Airport Gets Second FBO – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/busy-virginia-general-aviation-airport-gets-second-fbo-aviation-international-news/ https://businessaviationnews.com/busy-virginia-general-aviation-airport-gets-second-fbo-aviation-international-news/#respond Thu, 28 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526131

Leesburg Executive Airport (KJYO)—the second busiest general aviation airport in Virginia and located just 35 miles from Washington D.C.—has received a second service provider with the opening of Kuhn Jet Center. A sister to aircraft management provider Kuhn Aviation, the FBO is operating from a 34,000-sq-ft climate-controlled hangar that company president Scott Kuhn built in 2020.

The hangar, which can accommodate the latest ultra-long-range business jets, has a mezzanine with flight operation and aircraft management offices and a high-end owner’s lounge. Other amenities at the Titan Fuels-branded facility include heated garage parking; passenger lounge; concierge; eight-seat, A/V-equipped conference room; crew lounge and snooze room; crew cars; rampside vehicle valet; and on-site car rental.

“We are excited to open the Kuhn Jet Center to serve our growing community with more options, a higher level of service, and fair pricing,” said Kuhn. “Along with Kuhn Aviation, we look forward to our continuing partnership with the town of Leesburg and being part of the future of this thriving airport.”

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General Dynamics (GD) Q2 2022 Earnings Call Transcript – The Motley Fool https://businessaviationnews.com/general-dynamics-gd-q2-2022-earnings-call-transcript-the-motley-fool/ https://businessaviationnews.com/general-dynamics-gd-q2-2022-earnings-call-transcript-the-motley-fool/#respond Wed, 27 Jul 2022 17:00:57 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1455097

Image source: The Motley Fool.

General Dynamics (GD 1.05%)
Q2 2022 Earnings Call
Jul 27, 2022, 9:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good morning, and welcome to the General Dynamics second quarter 2022 earnings call. My name is Brica, and I will be your event specialist today. [Operator instructions] I now have the pleasure of handing the call over to our host, Howard Rubel, vice president of investor relations. So, Howard, please go ahead.

Howard RubelVice President of Investor Relations

Thank you, operator, and good morning, everyone. Welcome to the General Dynamics second quarter 2022 conference call. Any forward-looking statements made today represent our estimates regarding the company’s outlook. These estimates are subject to some risks and uncertainties.

Additional information regarding these factors is contained in the company’s 10-K, 10-Q, and 8-K filings. We will also refer to certain non-GAAP financial measures. For additional disclosures about these non-GAAP measures, including reconciliations to comparable GAAP measures, please see the slides that accompany this webcast, which are available on the Investor Relations page of our website, investorrelations.gd.com. With that completed, I would like to turn the call over to our senior vice president and chief financial officer, Jason Aiken.

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Howard. Good morning, everyone, and thanks for being with us. Before we get started, I want to let you all know that our chairman and chief executive officer, Phebe Novakovic, isn’t able to join us this morning. She recently came down with COVID, but not to worry, she’s on the mend and doing well, but she’s asked me to cover today’s call.

With me is Bill Moss, our vice president and corporate controller, who will cover some of the financial particulars that I would normally address. So with that, let’s get into the results. Earlier this morning, we reported earnings of $2.75 per diluted share on revenue of $9.2 billion, operating earnings of $978 million, earnings before taxes of $923 million, and net income of $766 million. Revenue was essentially flat against the second quarter last year, but operating earnings were up $19 million.

Earnings before taxes were up $40 million, and net earnings were up $29 million. Earnings per share were up $0.14, a 5.4% increase. To be a little more granular, we enjoyed revenue increases at aerospace and marine systems, offset by declines at combat systems and technologies. We also had margin improvement in three of the four segments, which led to higher operating earnings and earnings before taxes against the year-ago quarter.

From a slightly different perspective, we beat consensus by $0.03 per share on somewhat lower revenue, but somewhat higher operating margin than anticipated by the sell side. This led to the modest earnings beat. On a year-to-date basis, revenue, for all practical purposes, was even with last year’s first half. Similarly, operatingearnings were essentially flat, but earnings before taxes were up $46 million.

Net earnings were up $51 million, and EPS was up $0.25, almost 5%. In the quarter, free cash flow of $435 million was 57% of net income. Cash flow from operating activities was 86% of net income. This was pretty good in light of the powerful first-quarter cash.

To that point, year-to-date free cash flow of $2.3 billion was 151% of net earnings. In summary, we had a solid quarter from an earnings perspective, and the year-to-date results give us a solid start to the year. So let me move right into some color around the performance of the business segments, have Bill add color around cash, backlog, taxes, and deployment of cash, and then I’ll provide updated guidance. I’ll try to keep my remarks brief to leave ample opportunity for questions.

First, aerospace. Aerospace had revenue of $1.9 billion, operating earnings of $238 million, and a 12.7% operating margin. Revenue was $245 million more than the year-ago quarter or 15.1%, largely as a result of higher service center sales at Gulfstream and higher service volume, particularly FBOs at Jet Aviation. Operating earnings are up $43 million or 22.1% on a 70 basis point improvement in margins.

So increased sales volume, coupled with improved margins, leads to very good operating leverage. We captured improved revenue on only 22 deliveries. We didn’t deliver four G500 and 600s that were scheduled to deliver in the quarter. They’ve been deferred at customer request to the third quarter, awaiting removal of the FAA wind directive.

However, nine G500 and 600s, in fact, were delivered to customers in the quarter. So we delivered 9 of the 13 that were planned in the quarter. From an order perspective, we did very well once again. In dollar terms, aerospace had a book-to-bill of 2:1.

Gulfstream aircraft alone had a book-to-bill of 2.7:1 even stronger if expressed in unit terms. As previously discussed, sales activity truly accelerated in the middle of February 2021 and continued on to the second quarter of this year. The pipeline and sales activity remain strong as we enter this quarter. The Farnborough Air Show was a good one for us.

From a new product perspective, the G500 and G600 continue to perform well. Margins are improving on a consistent basis, and quality is superb. We’re making good progress in the flight test of the software update for landing and high winds and expect removal of the FAA directive in mid-September. You may recall that last quarter, we advised you of a risk of a three- to six-month delay for certification of the G700 to second quarter 2023 as a result of the time-consuming work on model-based software validation.

As a result of the flight sciences engineering resources we needed to redeploy onto the work related to the G500 and 600 FAA limitation on landings and high wind conditions, the risk to the G700 schedule has become a reality. As we’ve previously advised, this will not adversely impact our financial plan for 2022 and 2023. We feel confident that the G800 will follow the G700 by about six months. Looking forward, we’ve planned 123 deliveries for the year, and we fully expect to do just that.

Turning to defense. Combat systems had revenue of $1.7 billion, down 12.3% over the year-ago quarter. Revenue was impacted by Ajax at both land systems and ELS, at OTS, and some program mix. Operating earnings of $245 million were off against last year’s quarter by 7.9%, with a 70 basis point improvement in margins.

Operating margin was a strong 14.7%. On a sequential basis, revenue was very similar to the first quarter, but operating earnings were up 7.9% or $18 million on a 110 basis point improvement in operating margin. For the first half, combat systems revenue was down 10.2%, and operating earnings were down only 7.5% on a 40 basis point improvement in margins. In June, land systems was awarded the Mobile Protected Firepower contract, the first all-new combat vehicle for the army in decades.

The initial award for LRIP 1 was $410 million for 25 vehicles. The program of record for LRIP is $1.1 billion for 95 vehicles through 2026. The entire program requirement is 500 vehicles for more than $5 billion. The program fills a critical gap in the Army’s infantry brigade combat force, and we expect to move out swiftly on the program.

The quarter was very good for combat systems from an orders perspective with a 1.4:1 book-to-bill, leading to an increase in total backlog and estimated potential contract value. Demand for our products, particularly our combat vehicles, remains strong with Europe leading the way. International order opportunities for Abrams are particularly strong. This was an impressive operating performance once again by the combat systems group in a constrained revenue environment.

At marine systems, revenue of $2.65 billion was up $115 million over the year-ago quarter. It was flat sequentially but up year to date. In the quarter, growth was led by Columbia, TAO and repair work volume. For the first half, revenue was up $283 million or 5.6%.

This is very impressive continued growth. Operating earnings were $211 million in the quarter, essentially flat with the year-ago quarter as a result of a 30 basis point reduction in margin. The margin compression was the result of the impact on electric boat of additional scheduled delays in the Virginia program from the supply chain as it struggles with recovering from COVID. EB is working closely with the Navy and suppliers, including operating and engineering personnel on-site to restore the necessary Virginia program cadence.

Nonetheless, electric boat’s performance remained strong. And while still early in the Columbia first ship construction contract, the program remains on cost and schedule. Total backlog of almost $42 billion remains robust and is by far the largest of our operating groups. And lastly, technologies.

The segment had revenue of $3 billion in the quarter, down $158 million from the year-ago quarter or 5%. Two-thirds of the decline was attributed to mission systems, largely related to their continuing struggle with a shortage of chips which continues to plague their ability to deliver certain products. On the other hand, operating earnings of $304 million were down only $4 million or 1.3% on a 40 basis point improvement in operating margin to 10.1%. EBITDA margin was an impressive 14.1%, including state and local taxes, which are a 50 basis point drag on that result.

Operating performance at GDIT was particularly strong, 140 basis points better than the year-ago quarter. These are industry-leading margin figures. Technologies had a good order activity in the quarter with book-to-bill of 1:1 and good order prospects on the horizon. Mission systems had nice orders for many of their product offerings, especially those impacted by the chip shortage.

The IT pipeline remains healthy in most of our federal IT lines of business as the government continues to modernize and upgrade its mission support systems. GDIT has the opportunity to submit $35 billion in opportunities this year, including $17 billion in the third quarter, most of which represents new work. That concludes my remarks with respect to a solid quarter and first half. I’ll now turn the call over to Bill for further remarks, and then I’ll provide our updated guidance.

Bill MossVice President and Corporate Controller

Thank you, Jason, and good morning. Starting with cash performance in the quarter. From an operating cash flow perspective, we generated over $650 million, which following our strong first-quarter performance brings us to over $2.6 billion for the first six months of the year. This was achieved once again on the strength of the Gulfstream order book and additional collections on our large international combat vehicle contract, which continues to receive payments as scheduled according to the contract restructure that occurred in 2020.

Including capital expenditures, our free cash flow was $435 million for the quarter and $2.3 billion year to date, yielding a conversion rate of 151% year-to-date. The strong performance so far reinforces our outlook for the year of free cash flow conversion at or above 100% of net income. And of course, as a reminder, that outlook assumes current law with respect to the tax treatment of research and development expenditures. If the Congress acts to defer or reverse the current capitalization requirement, we would expect free cash flow for the year at or above 110% of net income.

Looking at capital deployment, capital expenditures were $224 million in the quarter or 2.4% of sales. That’s up from last year, consistent with our expectation to be around 2.5% of sales for the year. For the first six months, we’re closer to 2% of sales, but 2.5% remains our full-year target. We also paid $349 million in dividends and spent approximately $800 million on the repurchase of 3.6 million shares.

That brings year-to-date repurchases to 4.9 million shares for just shy of $1.1 billion. The net result at the end of the second quarter was a cash balance of $2.2 billion and a net debt position of $9.3 billion, down more than $2 billion from this time last year. As a result, net interest expense in the quarter was $95 million, down from $109 million in the second quarter of 2021. That brings the interest expense for the first half of the year to $193 million, down from $232 million for the same period in 2021.

At this point, we continue to expect our interest expense for the year to be approximately $380 million including the assumed repayment of $1 billion of notes that mature in the fourth quarter. The tax rate in the quarter was 17%, bringing the rate for the first half to 15.6%, so no change to our outlook of 16% for the full year. But of course, that implies a rate in the mid-16% range for the second half of the year to arrive at that outcome. To shape that for you, we expect the rate to be somewhat lower in the third quarter and higher in the fourth.

Order activity and backlog were once again a strong story in the second quarter with a 1.1:1 book-to-bill for the company as a whole. As Jason mentioned, order activity in aerospace led the way with a two times book-to-bill, which is the fifth consecutive quarter the book-to-bill for the group has been 1.6x or higher. As a result, aerospace backlog is up over $5 billion in the past year, an increase of almost 40%. During the quarter, we finalized negotiations on the restructure of the last of our arrangements with a fractional aircraft operator, which resulted in a roughly $300 million reduction in the aerospace backlog and a $900 million reduction in aircraft options.

This action essentially clears our backlog of any exposure to fractional customers and has no impact on our production and revenue forecast for 2022 and beyond. On the defense side, combat systems and technologies also had solid quarters with a 1.4 times and a one times book-to-bill, respectively. The increase in the combat systems backlog was particularly notable given a headwind from foreign exchange rate fluctuations of over $200 million in the quarter and $300 million year to date. Incidentally, the FX fluctuations also negatively impacted combat’s revenue by $65 million in the first half of the year as the euro fell to near parity with the dollar.

We finished the quarter with a total backlog of $87.6 billion, while total potential contract value, including options and IDIQ contracts was $126 billion. That concludes my remarks. I’ll turn it back over to Jason to give you an update on our guidance for 2022 and wrap-up remarks.

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Bill. Let me do my best to give you an updated forecast. The figures I’m about to give you are all compared to our January forecast, which I won’t repeat. There is, however, a chart with respect to this that will be posted on our website, which should be helpful.

In aerospace, we expect an additional $200 million of revenue with an operating margin of around 12.9%, which is 10 basis points higher than we previously forecast. This will result in additional operating earnings. There could be some upside here if we can deliver out a few more planes in the year. With respect to the defense businesses, combat systems should be on the low end of our revenue range with an improvement of up to 50 basis points of operating margin, so total revenue of around $7.1 billion and operating margin around 15%.

There’s no change to marine systems revenue, but 30 basis points lower margin, so annual revenue of $10.8 billion with an operating margin around 8.3% for the reasons I have previously described to you. Technologies revenue will be in the middle of the forecast revenue range at the same operating margin driven by GDIT with 3.5% year-over-year growth. So for the group, we expect annual revenue of around $12.9 billion with an operating margin around 10%. So on a companywide basis, we see annual revenue at the higher end of our initial guidance and an overall operating margin around 10.8%, which is unchanged.

This rolls up to EPS at the high end of our previous guidance range. In short, we expect only modest deviation from our initial guidance. That concludes my remarks, and we’ll be pleased to take your questions.

Howard RubelVice President of Investor Relations

Thank you, Jason. [Operator instructions] Operator, could you please remind participants how to enter the queue?

Questions & Answers:

Operator

[Operator instructions] We have our first question from Robert Stallard of Vertical Research.

Robert StallardVertical Research Partners — Analyst

Jason, I’ll kick it off with one for you. The big question we’ve been getting from folks is what the impact could be on business jet and the aerospace division from a slowdown in the global economy. I was wondering if you could give us some perspectives on how this could play out and how aerospace is differently positioned from where it was, say, in 2007, 2008?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. So I think the most important point here, Rob, is the robust nature of the demand we’ve seen up to this point, the order activity that, that’s resulted in, in the extended backlog that that provides us. not to mention, frankly — and Bill spoke to this a little bit in terms of some of the cleanup in the quarter, but the durability of the backlog that continues to just increase the quality of that order book as we move forward. So obviously, we can’t predict when and what any type of slowdown will look like.

There’s a lot of talk out in the market about interest rates, inflation, the stock market recession potential and so on. But to be completely frank with you, we have not yet seen any impact of that in terms of our order pipeline and the resulting order activity that we’ve seen. There continues to be a very strong customer demand. We’re continuing to see that as we embark here into the third quarter.

And so I think bottom line between the size of the backlog, the ongoing order activity, the durability of that backlog, which at this point is in excess of two and a half times our annual sales for the group. Notwithstanding the possibility of economic slowdown or similar conditions, we remain very confident and steadfast in our outlook for the next couple of years that we provided in terms of ’23, ’24, and beyond.

Robert StallardVertical Research Partners — Analyst

OK. And then as a follow-up, you mentioned the AJAX program in the combat systems division. Could you give us an update of what the situation is there and how it’s to pan out from here?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Sure. So the program is proceeding. The vehicle tests are continuing, and they continue to confirm, frankly, the vehicle performance that we’ve seen to date. With respect to some of the things that the customer has been focused on when it comes to vibration in the vehicle, some concerns that emerged in some of the early customer trials have been addressed at this point.

And we are working right now on — with the customer on securing appropriate communications gear. So I think the key here at this point is that this is going to really be all about how soon approvals can move through the system as we undergo this series of deliberate tests that take time, as would be the case on any new platform development program. Frankly, this is not inconsistent with experience that we would expect on any new platform development. But like I said, we continue to work with the customer, and they continue to assure us of their commitment to the program as well as of their need for this transformational capability.

So it’s an ongoing path forward, continuing to make progress, and we expect to see ourselves to the other side of this testing and trials period soon enough and onward and upward with the program.

Operator

We now have a question on the line from Seth Seifman of J.P. Morgan.

Seth SeifmanJ.P. Morgan — Analyst

Just to start off, I’m sure you’ve gotten this question a bunch of times, but with regard to moving forward on G500 and 600 and the landing restriction, it sounds like you’re still on track to have that lifted this quarter. And just any color you can give on what gives you the confidence there given that the Gulfstream, I think, has done all its work, but you’re dependent on the FAA to do their work.

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

No, you kind of summed it up nicely there, Seth. The fact is we have the software fix for this issue completed. It’s been developed. It has been tested.

It has been flown. And so we have great confidence in the efficacy of that software fix. And we are currently working with the FAA, Gulfstream and the FAA working concurrently toward the initiative to get this airworthiness directive resolved. The program plan for that is to complete by or before mid-September.

To your point, we are, in part, dependent on the resources of the FAA to make that happen. But they have been very good about this. They are committing the resources that we think are necessary and the teams are working together. And right now, everything seems to be right on track for a resolution of this by the end of the third quarter.

Seth SeifmanJ.P. Morgan — Analyst

Great. And then just as a follow-up, still in Aerospace. This might be kind of a crude measure, but just looking at the revenue per aircraft in the quarter, it looks pretty strong. But obviously, we don’t necessarily have all the information about mix and price and stuff like that.

Can you tell us what the service growth was to help us hone in on that? And then you mentioned a fractional settlement. Did that have any impact on the revenue in the quarter or any other backlog mechanics. Did those affect revenue?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. So on the service side, we did see very strong growth in the quarter. That’s continuing a trend that we’ve seen since we’ve been emerging from the pandemic, both including sort of flight hour ramp-up as activity and flight activity picks up around the world as well as FBO activity at our jet aviation business, particularly on the U.S. side.

So I think we had somewhere in excess of 35% growth year over year in the quarter in service activity. And it’s, frankly, that service activity that is driving the upside to the revenue and the outlook for the aerospace group for the year. As I mentioned earlier, we’re still expecting our 123 aircraft deliveries for the year. So a couple of hundred million dollars of additional revenue for the year is coming from that service side of the business.

And I know you referenced the cleanup, we mentioned the backlog, but I sort of missed the latter part of your question. Do you mind repeating what you were getting at there? I’m sorry, Seth. He has already dropped off the line. Perhaps you were getting at whether any of the cleanup in the backlog has affected any of the revenue or other aspects of the aerospace outlook.

And the fact is, no, we’re in good shape there. The cleanup, as I mentioned, or I think as Bill mentioned in the remarks, was related to an ongoing negotiation we had with our really last sizable fractional customer in that backlog and we’ve come to a settlement with that customer, removed some of the airplanes and expired some of the options there. And none of that activity has any impact on the outlook for the business. So all forecasts remain intact.

Operator

We now have our next question from David Strauss of Barclays.

David StraussBarclays — Analyst

Jason, when we were down at Gulfstream back in June, I think you talked — Gulfstream talked about being about 70% of the way through the software validation test on the 700. Can you just give us an update exactly where that stands today?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. I don’t have an exact number on the update of 70%. Obviously, the progress on that software validation has been slowed somewhat by the fact that we’ve had to divert common resources in terms of those flight sciences engineers over to the fix on the 500 and 600. So that, as I mentioned before, is really what’s sort of affirming our risk on the slip of the 700 entry into service.

So there’s been some modest progress there, but, call it, in that 70-plus percent range remains where we are at this point. As soon as we get through that airworthiness directive resolution, we’ll get those resources back on that program and moving forward to that updated EIS date.

David StraussBarclays — Analyst

OK. And as a follow-up, can you update us on supply chain? Any constraints you’re kind of seeing on the Gulfstream side of things? I think when we were down there, it was discussed about some shortages on the engine side. How do you feel about the overall supply chain at Gulfstream and your ability to hit that 123 delivery number for the full year?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. So as you referenced, supply chain is definitely — not to sugar coat it, it’s an ongoing issue for the industry. It’s no surprise or no secret that I think the commercial aerospace industry has had a fragile supply chain even before COVID hit. So it’s probably no surprise that that’s only been exacerbated.

And I’d say it’s a daily battle. But that said, I think there’s no team that I’d rather have tackled this issue than the Gulfstream team down there. They have people embedded throughout the supply chain, actively managing these issues with our partners to help them meet our commitments to our customers. And so I think while there can be issues from supplier to supplier and it’s an active management activity that’s going on.

It’s important to consider the impact of any part or subsystem or so on to the overall tack time of the airplane production process and ultimately, the delivery schedule. So just because, let’s say, a particular part may be missing its due on dock date doesn’t necessarily mean that that’s going to impact overall completion of the airplane or delivery of the customer between workaround that our team has and other efforts to keep the overall aircraft flow moving, we don’t see any impact to the delivery outlook that we have for the year. Obviously, these types of activities aren’t optimal. We want to get this corrected frankly, for the benefit of the entire ecosystem.

But we continue to have great confidence in the team at Gulfstream to get through the challenge and they’ll meet their aircraft delivery forecast for the year.

Operator

We now have the next question from Ron Epstein of Bank of America.

Ron EpsteinBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Question for you on, again, kind of maybe going back to the supply chain, but focusing a little bit more on defense. So it seems like at Gulfstream, you guys are managing the constraints well. We’ve heard from some of the engine producers that castings and forgings and things are tight, and you’re managing through that. But it seems like you’ve got a lot more flexibility in your commercial business than you do in your defense business.

And one of the themes that seems to have emerged from this quarter is that because of the way defense contracting is done, we continue to hear shortages of A, B, and C. Is there anything you guys can do about chip shortages, buying inventory ahead? Or are you just so constrained by the kind of the materials management acquisition rules that you can’t do that? Because it seems like defense is just sort of fundamentally this sort of just-in-time business, but we’re in sort of a just-in-case world, if you get the gist of the question.

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. No, it’s a great question, Ron, and I’ll kind of break that down into two aspects of our business, sort of the short-term side and the long-term side. And the piece that we’re seeing a bigger issue in on the short-term side, and you referred to the chip shortage, it’s really that the mission systems piece that we’ve talked about for some time now. And again, that’s because these are quick-turn orders.

They’re product-driven. They’re dependent on these chips, and you got to get them out the door. And obviously, these are highly engineered, high-end design engineering-type products. So to your point, the specifications are quite specific.

That said, number one, I think the team is doing a tremendous job trying to develop workaround. They are out there ordering parts in advance where they can. It’s tough to get your spot in line because this is an issue affecting not just the industry, but the broader economy, but they’re doing their best they can on that front. They are also working to change designs, modify designs, accept alternate parts where they can and be as nimble as they can on that front, but that obviously takes some time.

I think importantly, for that side of the business, this is just a timing issue we’ve seen here. If you take, for example, the second quarter and the product it wasn’t able to ship at the end of the quarter, we’ve seen the vast majority of that actually get shipped in the first month of the third quarter. So that is flowing through. It doesn’t mean we’re out of the woods yet.

I think this is going to be something that’s going to bug us for the balance of the year and maybe spill over a little into next year. But the fact is we’ve seen some of the strongest order activity from the customer in this area. So I think this is just a timing thing. We’ll come through it and the order demand is there so that this will continue on into the balance of this year and beyond.

So that’s sort of on the short-term side of the business. The other big supply chain side that we’re seeing, frankly, is a little bit different. It’s on, frankly, the longest leg side of the business, and that’s in the shipbuilding side. And really there, it’s less about parts or material availability.

It’s about the availability of labor, the price and availability of skilled labor. And so we’re seeing that really hit the supply chain for us. And for us, it’s focused primarily on the Virginia Class program. When you think of NASCO out on the West Coast and frankly, the Columbia program at Electric Boat, those are all hitting this in stride.

But on the Virginia program, the supply chain has stumbled a little bit more. And when you think about it, we have been working hard, even prior to COVID, to ramp up our resources on those programs to support two per year Virginia as well as the addition of Columbia. And we were making pretty good headwind on that. And then COVID hits, and you take two steps back instead — or at least a pause instead of needing to take two steps forward.

So when you think about shipbuilding and the nature of that business, a shock like that to the system can hit it quickly, but it just takes time for it to recover. And so that’s what we’re seeing on the Virginia program as the supply chain is struggling to catch back up and sort of hit that cadence that they need to be on. But again, like Gulfstream, like mission systems, Electric Boat has got all the resources that we can bring to bear and all the sense of urgency to apply to that supply chain. And once we can get that schedule right, I think we’ll be back on track.

But in the meantime, that schedule extension brings cost, and that cost brings an impact to margins, and that’s what’s affecting our outlook for that business. So that’s — I’m trying to give you a complete answer as I can on the supply chain as it hits the defense side. So that’s sort of both into the spectrum from my perspective.

Ron EpsteinBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Yes. Got it. And then maybe just one quick follow-up on combat. With all the awards that have been coming in and the activity in Europe, when would you expect that to flow through the business? Is that a ’23 kind of thing? When would we expect to see that kind of — at least on the top line?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, good question. I want to take a step back and maybe give a little clarity on what we’ve seen through the first half of this year and then what that means for where we’re going. Obviously, in the first half of the year, we’re down notionally a little bit more than you would expect given our full-year outlook. I think we’re about 10% down year to date.

If you do some quick checking, you’ll see that what that’s really a function of it that last year, our revenue per quarter was essentially consistent throughout the year, first quarter, second quarter, third quarter, which is really in contrast to the tried and true annual cycle that we see in combat systems and we’re, frankly, once again, seeing this year, which is a sequential ladder, if you will, lowest in the first quarter, rising to the fourth quarter. So that created a little unusual headwind in terms of the year-over-year comparisons. But we’re still — based on the way the second half plays out, still expecting to be at the low end of our revenue forecast. So what does that imply? That implies about a 3.5% growth in the second half versus the second half of last year, and I think that’s imminently achievable by that group.

But looking beyond that, to your point, there’s a tremendous amount of activity in this market. Obviously, as I mentioned before, the MPF award is a big one for us. That’s a whole new additive space in the infantry brigade combat structure there. And there’s tremendous demand signals internationally, as you mentioned.

Obviously, we’re working toward the tank opportunity in Poland. There’s other international tank opportunities, as I mentioned before. And then you alluded to sort of demand generally, internationally, and everybody has kind of the suspicion that everything going on in Eastern Europe is going to lead to significant growth for the — on the defense side. And certainly, we are seeing those demand signals.

I think the key thing that we all have to keep in mind here is to keep and check our expectations with respect to timing. The demand signals are there. We are having regular dialogue and ongoing conversation with those customers about that interest. But it just takes time for interest to turn into budgets, to turn it into appropriations, to turn into contracts to turn into revenue.

So I think it’s all consistent with our long-term outlook that by 2024 and beyond, we ought to see a nice uptick trajectory in combat systems. We’re still talking low to mid-single-digit growth, but we ought to see an inflection point to growth out in that period. And all of that is supportive of this. But in the meantime, I’d just reiterate our emphasis that the focus and the story for combat systems is a margin one.

And you’ve seen how well, once again, this group can perform on the margin side and be a really good cyclical no matter what’s happening on the top line.

Operator

The next question comes from Robert Spingarn of Melius Research.

Robert SpingarnMelius Research — Analyst

Jason, I just want to go back to labor and talk across all the businesses, where you stand, where — obviously, you said shipbuilding is a tough one. So maybe that’s the most challenging area. But when you look across the business, what is the labor and talent acquisition situation?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, you touched on it, Rob. The shipbuilding side has been the toughest one. We’ve seen that in Maine. We’ve seen that all over sort of the New England shipyards as we’ve tried to ramp up.

And frankly, those are the two shipyards at EB and Bath that we have the most opportunity to ramp up. And so you got — it’s not like a lot of other industries where you’re hearing things about remote work the ability to pull people from all over the country and all over the world. You’ve got to get shipbuilders in those states and in those regions to do that work. And so that’s what presents the challenge.

The good news is we — as I mentioned, well before COVID, we had been ramping up and anticipating ramp-up. And so we’ve had a lot of resources put in place as well as great partnerships at the state and local levels to get the kind of trade schools and apprenticeships and so on to make that happen. So I think the resources are in place. We’ve just got to keep our flow moving through those processes, keep our training capabilities up and running, and we can catch back up with this.

It’s just going to take time. And again, that’s just sort of the nature of shipbuilding, and it’s a challenge that those teams are up to. When you look on the other end of the spectrum, I think it’s all about GDIT. And obviously, they are in a hypercompetitive market for hyper-skilled talent, and that only gets more competitive all the time.

I think the leading positions they have in their markets, the strong culture they have and continue to build with that workforce and the opportunities that they provide their workforce within the company continue to, I think, put them in a good position to compete and keep and grow that talent it’s — I’m not going to sugarcoat it, though, it’s a war for talent every day. And we just — it’s our job to keep up with that and punch above our weight and continue to retain and draw in the kind of talent they need to do that work and as that business grows. So those are kind of the two ends of the spectrum. I think the other area that we monitor it closely is at Gulfstream.

Obviously, with the growth they have, you need people to do that. I think not to underestimate the challenge that they have, but I think they’ve done a really good job of keeping up with it, and I don’t see that as being as high a nail an item for Gulfstream in the moment. There’s nothing that we can take our eye off the ball, and they’ve got to keep at it, but I think they’re up to that challenge as well.

Robert SpingarnMelius Research — Analyst

OK. And then just as a follow-up, going specifically to Electric Boat and the focus on getting Columbia ramped up and the labor situation you just talked about there. Have we seen any work packages moved between Electric Boat and Newport News in order to manage volumes and address labor shortages either for you or for them?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So, Rob, I hate to give you this answer, but that’s the kind of thing I don’t think I should probably get into too great a detail. We obviously work very closely with them as our teaming partner on Virginia as well as our subcontractor on Columbia. It’s a three-part conversation between us, Newport and the Navy to make sure that we’re doing everything we can to support that customer and the growth that they need. And I think that’s the most important message is we’re going to do everything we can to support that customer, and we’re working together as a team to do that.

And both sides, I think, have a mutuality around that that’s very important and very supportive. So —

Operator

We now have the next question on the phone line from Doug Harned of Bernstein.

Doug HarnedAllianceBernstein — Analyst

I wanted to see if you could give us a little bit of a picture on the mix of Gulfstream orders. And in particular, the G650 has extended longer than I think you all first expected strong demand. Can you give us a sense of what the mix is and then also how you’re looking at G650 production over time?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, you’re absolutely right. The G650 order activity continues to be robust, frankly, beyond even what we, I think, perhaps conservatively expected. I think we’ve said a couple of times now in the past, and it continues to be the case that the announcement of the G700 and the G800 have absolutely for our market and our customers clarified where we are with this family of aircraft. And it clarifies what the 650 is in terms of an opportunity for those customers.

So that airplane, I think, continues to have legs to it. To make no mistake about it, the 800 is the replacement for the 650. And as the 800 comes into service, we will work the 650 out. There may be some modest overlap as we feather in from one to the other.

But I think what this outsized demand on the 650 does is it gives us a lot of optionality. It gives us opportunity if this demand environment continues. With respect to our outlook for ’23 and 2024, we’ll have to see how that plays out. It’s also giving us the optionality to deal with some of these issues we’ve talked about with the certification process.

As the 700 slips, we’re not backtracking on our commitments to the delivery units, the revenue, and the earnings forecast that we’ve given for ’22, ’23, and ’24. And frankly, the 650 demand is helping with that as well as the demand environment in general. And to that point, you kind of asked about the whole portfolio. And I think there’s some question and speculation out there among the community about the airworthiness directive and what that might mean for the 500 and 600.

And I’d tell you, again, we delivered the vast majority of the airplanes that we intended to this quarter. We expect that to be resolved by the end of the third quarter. And when you look at the order activity in the second quarter, I think the 500 and 600 represented about half the order activity that we had. So there’s no signs of slowing down there.

Our customers understand what this little bump in the road is, and so those platforms continue to be very well supported. So across the board — and I didn’t even mention the G280, that continues to have great order demand. I think the mid-cabin space has really picked up in the aftermath of COVID. So really across the board, in the portfolio, we see broad-based demand for our airplanes.

Doug HarnedAllianceBernstein — Analyst

And then just as a follow-up, switching over to technologies, I mean I know there’s been you’ve had challenges with award protests, and so there have been some difficulties. But this is something where we’ve been looking for growth for a long time. And if you look out over the next few years, I mean how are you thinking about technologies in terms of a growth trajectory? Because we just haven’t really seen it yet.

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So obviously, this is a conversation we’ve been in for some time now. And I think if you look back, we had low single-digit growth last year. We’re expecting modestly better growth this year. And as I reiterated earlier, our updated outlook for the year is spot on in the middle of our revenue range we gave back in January.

Obviously, we’re off to a little bit of a slower start to the year, but I’d say a little bit of a slower start, and that’s largely attributable to mission systems. I won’t reiterate those issues, but we do believe that that is a timing issue for us. GDIT is flat for the first half, but we absolutely have a clear line of sight to growth for them in the second half. And so look, I mean, what gives us confidence in this outlook? I think the way we look at it is not any one particular win or loss or one program or another.

It’s really about all of the key what I think about as leading indicator data or statistics that are around a business that is made up of thousands of contracts across the portfolio. You’re talking about order activity, win and capture rates on new as well as recompete business, book-to-bill, backlog, potential contract value, so on and so forth. And all of those metrics for us continue to support an outlook for this business of low to mid-single-digit growth. And when you look at GDIT, for example, they had awards in the first half that were valued at about $7 billion.

And that’s significantly higher than the first half of last year, and the vast majority of that represents new work. So obviously, this can be frustrating, I think, for you all. And sometimes it is for us given the particularly lumpy aspect of this business when it comes to the protest and delayed award adjudication process. So it can come in fits and starts.

But we remain bullish on this, and we think bottom line, we’re talking about a low to mid-single-digit growth outlook. And frankly, as I think about it, you may have noticed a couple of weeks after the quarter, we had the announcement of the Air Force European support contracts, some $900-plus million opportunity. If that had happened a couple of weeks earlier, it would be kind of a completely different conversation around the book-to-bill for the Technologies group in the quarter. So that’s just a one-off example, but it speaks to the point that while timing can be frustrating and lumpy and the pipeline can be a challenge to get through, it doesn’t change our long-term outlook for this business.

Operator

We now have Peter Arment of Baird.

Peter ArmentRobert W. Baird and Company — Analyst

Maybe we can get just your updated thoughts on — we’ve seen the markups from defense budget working their way through the Senate and House. How is that impacting some of your defense business? And obviously, I mean there’s been a focus on combat and technology, so kind of returning to growth. And just kind of any color you can provide there, that would be helpful.

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. I think the two things that I’d point out, it’s obviously still very early in that process. But bottom line as you’d expect, shipbuilding remains extremely well supported. You can see the numbers there.

And so that, I think, just continues to be supportive of our — an underpinning of our outlook for the ongoing $400 million to $500 million a year growth in the marine systems business. So all positive there. I think the greater area of maybe anxiety or speculation is around combat systems and the Army budgets. We’ll see where that goes.

This is obviously something that ebbs and flows and has a lot higher beta in terms of an Army budget on an annual basis than on the Navy strategic side. But the fact is we can’t ignore the fact that there is a significant amount of support among the Congress for increasing defense budgets. So Abrams, Stryker, those continue to be very critical assets in the Army infrastructure, and we think there’s continued support for those. And so while there’s a lot of chatter around it, those are going to decline and what’s going to happen, let’s just see how it plays out.

I think we’ll have to stay tuned and see.

Peter ArmentRobert W. Baird and Company — Analyst

OK. And just as a quick follow-up. Your thoughts on just any impact if we have a continuing resolution. Obviously, this is not — you guys have managed through a lot of continuing resolutions.

So just thoughts on any impact there?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. I don’t see any real high anxiety in the moment. It’s obviously something to your point that we’ve learned to work with and work around. It’s certainly not desirable by any stretch of the imagination, but it’s almost become part of our annual reality.

I think until these things get into a six-, seven-month-plus type of situation, that’s when it really starts to affect our shorter-cycle business on the technology side, perhaps in the munition side. But beyond that, we really don’t see a significant impact at this point. Again, it’s unfortunate. We don’t like it, but we’ve learned to try to operate around it.

Operator

We would now like to have the next question from Sheila Kahyaoglu from Jefferies.

Sheila KahyaogluJefferies — Analyst

I wanted to maybe ask a shorter-term question, to follow up on Doug’s on technologies. It was down 3% in the first half and up 10% growth in the second half implied with the guidance. GDIT seems to be doing well, like fairly flat. Can you maybe bridge us on mission and how you think about supply chain getting back growing in the second half timing of funding because a lot of the GDIT peers have complained about that.

Maybe if you could just bridge us shorter term.

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. You’ve touched on the key issues, but I think the biggest piece of it is what I mentioned before is that we’re already seeing here in the third quarter our ability to catch back up on some of that delayed product shipment from the second quarter. We really got that balled up there toward the end of the second quarter, and that hampered the revenue for the first half. But we — look, I don’t want to sugarcoat the challenge is mission systems is not out of the woods.

So they’re going to fight and scrap their way, but they’re seeing their way toward workarounds on that supply chain side. And I have a good deal of confidence that they can get there. On the GDIT side, it is a frustrating environment in terms of the slow pace of the outlays. Frankly, we’ve seen that a bit on both the mission systems and GDIT side.

But I think the hill that they have to climb in the second half is not as high. And I think we’ve got reasonable line of sight in terms of the work that’s in the books and they just got to go execute on that should get them there in the second half. They’ve just got a little bit of go to get in the second half. So I feel even greater confidence on the GDIT side.

Sheila KahyaogluJefferies — Analyst

OK. And then I just wanted to ask a cleanup on aerospace. When we think about the 123 delivery side, how much of that includes G700s? And then given the raise was on service, how much of the services business is in the backlog?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So I don’t necessarily get into detailed order — backlog and ordering cancellations on an aircraft-by-aircraft basis. I apologize, I’m going to have to punt on that one. But on the service side, we typically don’t have much in the way of service activity in the backlog. We have a very modest amount in the aerospace unfunded backlog category that is related to longer-term maintenance arrangements that we have with some larger customers.

But the service activity across the board at jet aviation and Gulfstream is really a book-and-bill basis on a quarterly and annual basis, so sort of a one-to-one typically there.

Howard RubelVice President of Investor Relations

Operator, we will just take one more question.

Operator

Thank you — we have the last question from Cai von Rumohr of Cowen.

Cai von RumohrCowen and Company — Analyst

Yes. So orders at Gulfstream for aircraft, you mentioned about half in the quarter was for the 500, 600. You mentioned that the 650 is doing well. How is the 800? Because that’s been introduced relatively lately.

You now have a new competitor in the market that looks like they match you in range with four versus three sections. So how is the 800 doing?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. The demand for that aircraft is quite solid, Cai. It’s doing well every quarter. Booking orders, I think between the fact that the 650 is still taking orders and the fact that the EIS for the 800 is still a good ways out, we’re not expecting a massive surge in orders.

As we start to move closer to that transition, you might expect it to pick up and shift more from the 650 to the 800. But right now, I’d tell you, it’s just good, solid order activity that is very much supportive of our EIS timing and our expectations for that airplane.

Cai von RumohrCowen and Company — Analyst

Terrific. And could you could give us a little bit more color in terms of the order potential for combat? You mentioned Europe is strong. You mentioned Abrams. How about the rest of your vehicles? How about the munitions business?

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So the rest of the vehicles, you have to think about our European land systems business. They have an extremely large installed base of wheeled and tracked combat vehicles that, on the one hand, have a replacement cycle with them that offers some opportunity in the out years as well as it provides incentive for those who are trying to bring up their level of defense spending to do so in a way that aligns with their allies. And if their allies are operating and fighting one particular platform or another, that’s an incentive for those who are starting to spend up more to achieve commonality with those allies. So we think that puts us in good stead for these opportunities that are coming out of threats in Europe.

Across the board, though, to be a little more specific, a lot of this stuff is either in the backlog or on the horizon, when you think about the Spanish 8×8 vehicle. You’ve got, again, the potential — or the — I shouldn’t say the potential. The impending order for tanks out of Poland. We’re talking with Romania, Switzerland, all of those are sort of bread and butter countries are all looking at increased spending on a variety of platforms.

So that plus just sort of this, again, generic increased level of indicated interest across Europe, particularly Eastern Europe, I think it provides tremendous potential opportunity. It’s just too early to try and count any of that and anticipate exactly when or what that looks like. Timing in Europe often can be a challenge. So it would probably be a bit of a fool’s errand for me to try and get too specific around that.

But we do see a good robust environment as supportive of combat.

Howard RubelVice President of Investor Relations

And, Brica, operator, I think we are done with the question-and-answer period, and I thank everybody for joining the call today. As a reminder, please refer to the General Dynamics website for the second-quarter earnings release and the highlights presentation, which will contain our earnings outlook. If you have any additional questions, I can be reached at (703) 876-3117. Brica, you can now indicate the call is over, please.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 0 minutes

Call participants:

Howard RubelVice President of Investor Relations

Jason AikenSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Bill MossVice President and Corporate Controller

Robert StallardVertical Research Partners — Analyst

Seth SeifmanJ.P. Morgan — Analyst

David StraussBarclays — Analyst

Ron EpsteinBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Robert SpingarnMelius Research — Analyst

Doug HarnedAllianceBernstein — Analyst

Peter ArmentRobert W. Baird and Company — Analyst

Sheila KahyaogluJefferies — Analyst

Cai von RumohrCowen and Company — Analyst

More GD analysis

All earnings call transcripts

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FBO expansion to QC International Airport will offer charters, flight school, maintenance – WQAD Moline https://businessaviationnews.com/fbo-expansion-to-qc-international-airport-will-offer-charters-flight-school-maintenance-wqad-moline/ https://businessaviationnews.com/fbo-expansion-to-qc-international-airport-will-offer-charters-flight-school-maintenance-wqad-moline/#respond Wed, 27 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526135

The fixed-based operator would allow QCIA to offer smaller, general aviation services like flight school, maintenance and charter flights.

MOLINE, Ill. — An aviation company has announced an expansion to the Quad Cities International Airport that would allow it to offer more general aviation services.

On Wednesday, July 27, Revv Aviation, a Midwestern aviation services company, announced a fixed-base operator expansion to QCIA, in what it calls a fresh approach to the service.

A fixed-base operator, or FBO, is a company that, with the permission of the airports they operate in, offers numerous aeronautical services to aircraft, passengers and crew on-site. This includes maintenance, facilities, aircraft sales and rentals, and much more. They are the main service providers for general aviation and private, recreational flying.

Revv Aviation is known for building a network of FBOs at airports across the Midwest, with the new QCIA facility marking its eighth installation. Revv’s FBOs offer a full range of aviation services, including flight training, maintenance, charter, avionics, fueling, and storage.

QCIA’s facility is planned to offer a flight school, a maintenance facility, and charter flights.

“I’ve been observing Revv over the past two years and this is an ideal company to continue Moline’s legacy of supporting general aviation.,” said Benjamin Leischner, A.A.E., executive director at the Quad Cities International Airport. “Their passion for aviation is evident in everything they do. Revv will pursue aggressive development of our existing general aviation plans on the airfield.”

“Imagine a world where our towns are connected, not just by roads but also by airways,” said Guy Lieser, president and CEO of Revv Aviation. “As we introduce aviation to more people across America’s Heartland, we hope to bring the wonder of flight to communities, business leaders, families, schools, and city developers. Airports are like the exit ramp on the highway, and if we attract more flights to land at our FBOs, refuel, and get aircraft maintained, the whole town and region benefit. As a part of the CL Enterprises group of companies we are more than an FBO at the local airport; we are a part of the community and participate, wherever possible, in economic development initiatives.”

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NTSB issues preliminary report on RED Air MD-82 accident, Miami https://businessaviationnews.com/ntsb-issues-preliminary-report-on-red-air-md-82-accident-miami/ https://businessaviationnews.com/ntsb-issues-preliminary-report-on-red-air-md-82-accident-miami/#respond Thu, 21 Jul 2022 08:52:32 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1409437

Narrative:
RED Air flight 203, a McDonnell Douglas MD-82, HI1064, suffered a left-hand main gear failure during landing on runway 09 at Miami International Airport (MIA), Florida, USA.
The flight departed Santo Domingo International Airport (SDQ), Dominican Republic , at 15:35. The aircraft was cleared for the ILS runway 09 at MIA and the crew reported that the approach was normal. The first officer stated to the NTSB that the landing was smooth, and they first touched down on the right main gear followed by the left main gear slightly right of centerline. The crew felt an increasing vibration on the left side of the airplane shortly after the left main gear touched down. During the landing roll out the left main gear collapsed, the airplane traveled to the left where it eventually departed the paved surface and impacted the runway 30 glide slope equipment shelter. During departure from the paved surface and impact with the steel and concrete shelter, the airplane’s right main landing gear and nosewheel collapsed, and the fuel tanks were breached. Shortly after the airplane came to a stop, a post-crash fire began on the right wing. All 130 passengers and 10 crew evacuated the airplane, of which 4 passengers sustained minor injuries.

Accident investigation:

Investigating agency:  NTSB
Status: Investigation ongoing
Accident number: DCA22FA132
Download report: Preliminary report
Language: 

Classification:

Landing gear collapse
Runway excursion (veer-off)

Sources:

» wsvn.com
» www.miamiherald.com
» RED Air statement
» NRSB

METAR Weather report:

20:53 UTC / 16:53 local time:
KMIA 212053Z COR 05010G18KT 10SM FEW030 BKN250 30/19 A3008 RMK AO2 SLP187 CB DSNT SE AND SW MOV S T03000194 $

21:53 UTC / 17:53 local time:
KMIA 212153Z 05009G16KT 10SM FEW030 FEW045 BKN250 30/16 A3008 RMK AO2 SLP187 T03000161 $

Photos


accident date: 21-06-2022
type: McDonnell Douglas MD-82
registration: HI1064

 

Video, social media

Aircraft history

18 December 1990 N16545 American Airlines delivered
12 August 2014 N16545 American Airlines withdrawn from use
28 May 2015 N16545 Aerothrust Holdings registered
7 Sep 2017 YV3367 LASER delivered
15 February 2021 HI1064 Red Air delivered

Map

This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Santo Domingo-Las Américas José Francisco Peña Gómez Int’l Airport to Miami International Airport, FL as the crow flies is 1358 km (849 miles).
Accident location: Exact; deduced from official accident report.

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.

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NTSB: Learjet 60 overran runway after landing on wrong runway https://businessaviationnews.com/ntsb-learjet-60-overran-runway-after-landing-on-wrong-runway/ https://businessaviationnews.com/ntsb-learjet-60-overran-runway-after-landing-on-wrong-runway/#respond Wed, 20 Jul 2022 16:40:56 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1404927

Narrative:
The flight crew of the Learjet 60 inadvertently landed on runway 30 instead of runway 34 at Chicago Executive Airport, Illinois, USA, and the aircraft overran the runway.
Before departure, the captain conducted a time-of-arrival landing distance assessment and calculated a factored landing distance of 4,790 ft. The landing distance available on runway 34 was 5,001 ft.

During the visual approach to the airport, the flight crew misidentified runway 30 as runway 34; visually aligned with runway 30, which had an available landing distance of 3,983 ft; and used the runway 30 PAPI lights to provide vertical guidance to the runway. Sufficient landing distance was not available on runway 30, and the captain steered the airplane to the left after realizing that it would not be able to stop before the end of the runway surface. The airplane subsequently overran the runway and came to rest by the airport perimeter fence, causing substantial damage to the right wing. The flight crew did not recognize its runway alignment error until after landing.

Probable Cause:

Probable Cause: The flight crew’s misidentification of the landing runway, which resulted in a runway overrun and the airplane’s impact with the airport perimeter fence.

Accident investigation:

Investigating agency:  NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration:  1 year and 9 months
Accident number: DCA21LA011
Download report: Summary report
Language:  English

Classification:

Takeoff from wrong runway
Runway excursion (overrun)

Sources:

» flightaware.com

Photos


accident date: 21-10-2020
type: Learjet 60
registration: N1128M
photo of Learjet-60-

 

Map

This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Airport, OH to Chicago-Executive Airport, IL as the crow flies is 531 km (332 miles).
Accident location: Exact; as reported in the official accident report.

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.

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Report: EMB-145 hit ground after crew continued descent without having runway in sight https://businessaviationnews.com/report-emb-145-hit-ground-after-crew-continued-descent-without-having-runway-in-sight/ https://businessaviationnews.com/report-emb-145-hit-ground-after-crew-continued-descent-without-having-runway-in-sight/#respond Fri, 15 Jul 2022 09:13:24 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1366634

Narrative:
United Express flight 4933, operated by CommutAir, was attempting to land on runway 1 at Presque Isle International Airport (PQI), Maine, USA, and impacted terrain to the right of the runway.
The first officer and two of the passengers were injured. The airplane was substantially damaged.

The accident flight departed from Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), New Jersey, about 10:04. The captain was the pilot monitoring, and the first officer was the pilot flying. The en route portion of the flight was uneventful.
Once the airplane was in range of PQI, the flight crew received an updated airport weather report at the time, a special weather observation at 10:31. The observation indicated that the wind was from 090° at 5 knots, visibility was 1/2 mile in moderate snow and freezing fog, and the cloud ceiling was broken at 1,100 ft and overcast at 1,800 ft.
At 11:01 a controller from the Boston Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) cleared the flight for an ILS approach to runway 1, and the crew was subsequently instructed to change to the PQI common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF); PQI did not have an air traffic control tower.
The captain made position reports during the approach and at 11:08:38 she stated that the approach was stable and that she had “ground contact.”
At 11:09:54, the captain stated, “runway in sight. See it?” to which the first officer responded, “yeah” and “well I got somethin’ [that] looks like a runway up there.” After losing sight of the runway, at 11:10:09, the captain stated, “go missed” twice. The first officer stated that, when he transitioned from looking at the instruments to looking outside, he expected to see the runway but saw what he described as “white on white.”
The airplane had descended to a minimum pressure altitude of 703 ft (169 ft agl) before beginning to ascend.

The flight then positioned for a second approach to runway 1. The captain made the 1,000-ft callout at 11:27:21 and stated that the approach was stable. At 11:28:37, the enhanced ground proximity warning system announced “minimums,” shortly after the captain had made the 100-ft callout.
About 2 seconds after the “minimums” annunciation, the captain called, “runway in sight twelve o’clock.”
The first officer stated that, when he transitioned from the instruments to the outside during the second approach, he saw “white on white” again and blowing snow. The first officer also stated that it was difficult to comprehend what he was seeing outside the airplane because everything was covered in snow and that, before he could determine what he was seeing, the airplane touched down.
The airplane came to rest in the snow-covered grassy area between runway 1 and a parallel taxiway located about 630 ft to the right of the runway. The airplane’s resting location was about 3,600 ft beyond the runway threshold, about 305 ft to the right of the runway centerline, and about 230 ft from the right edge of runway.

Probable Cause:

Probable Cause:
The flight crew’s decision, due to confirmation bias, to continue the descent below the decision altitude when the runway had not been positively identified.
Contributing to the accident were (1) the first officer’s fatigue, which exacerbated his confirmation bias, and (2) the failure of CommutAir pilots who had observed the localizer misalignment to report it to the company and air traffic before the accident.

Accident investigation:

Investigating agency:  NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration:  3 years and 4 months
Accident number: DCA19FA089
Download report: Final report
Language:  English

Classification:

Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) – Ground

Sources:

» Flightaware

METAR Weather report:

15:31 UTC / 10:31 local time:
KPQI 041531Z AUTO 09005KT 1/2SM -SN FZFG BKN011 OVC018 M02/M04 A2971 RMK AO2 P0000 FZRANO RVRNO

15:56 UTC / 10:56 local time:
KPQI 041556Z AUTO 08006KT 1/2SM SN FZFG OVC013 M02/M04 A2970 RMK AO2 SLP103 P0001 T10221044 FZRANO RVRNO

16:18 UTC / 11:18 local time:
KPQI 041618Z AUTO 06004KT 1/2SM SN FZFG M03/M04 A2968 RMK AO2 P0000 FZRANO RVRNO

16:43 UTC / 11:43 local time:
KPQI 041643Z AUTO 07005KT 3/4SM -SN SCT008 OVC013 M01/M04 A2967 RMK AO2 P0001 FZRANO RVRNO

Photos


accident date: 04-03-2019
type: Embraer EMB-145XR
registration: N14171
photo of Embraer-EMB-145XR-N14171
accident date: 04-03-2019
type: Embraer EMB-145XR
registration: N14171
photo of Embraer-EMB-145XR-N14171
ground tracks from 1st and 2nd approach
photo of Embraer-EMB-145XR-N14171
accident date: 04-03-2019
type: Embraer EMB-145XR
registration: N14171

 

Video, social media

Map

This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line is connecting ADS-B datapoints from FlightAware.
Distance from Newark-Liberty International Airport, NJ to Presque Isle International Airport, ME as the crow flies is 823 km (514 miles).
Accident location: Approximate; accuracy within a few kilometers.

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.

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A320 nearly struck terrain during go around at Paris-CDG https://businessaviationnews.com/a320-nearly-struck-terrain-during-go-around-at-paris-cdg/ https://businessaviationnews.com/a320-nearly-struck-terrain-during-go-around-at-paris-cdg/#respond Wed, 13 Jul 2022 09:02:15 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1352696

This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information.
If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date: 23-MAY-2022
Time: 11:41 UTC
Type: Airbus A320-233
Owner/operator: Norwegian Air Sweden, opb AirHub Airlines
Registration: 9H-EMU
MSN: 1087
Fatalities: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 178
Other fatalities: 0
Aircraft damage: None
Category: Serious incident
Location: 1 nm E of Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport (CDG/LFPG) –
  France

Phase: Approach
Nature: Passenger – Scheduled
Departure airport: Stockholm-Arlanda Airport (ARN/ESSA)
Destination airport: Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport (CDG/LFPG)
Investigating agency:  BEA
Confidence Rating: Information verified through data from accident investigation authorities

Narrative:
Norwegian Air Sweden flight D84311, an Airbus A320-233, nearly struck the ground on approach to Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport in France when it descended to 6 feet above ground level during a go-around.

The flight was operated by AirHub Airlines on behalf of Norwegian Air Sweden and had departed Stockholm-Arlanda Airport (ARN), bound for Paris-CDG. Weather at Paris-Charles de Gaulle was poor due to Cumulonimbus (CB) clouds with rain showers, causing limited visibility.
The flight was cleared for an Required Navigation Performance (RNP) approach to runway 27R. The lateral guidance in this RNP approach relied on satellite (GNSS) positioning. Vertical guidance was based on the aircraft barometric altitude.

During descent, the Intermediate (ITM) controller at CDG twice reported the QNH altimeter pressure setting to be 1011 instead of 1001 mb.
The controller also reported this incorrect setting to an easyJet flight, but that crew read back the correct value (1001).
The ITM instructed later gave instructions to an Air France flight, in French, with the correct QNH 1001.
The flight crew was subsequently cleared to land by the Tower controller while descending around 280 ft below the descent profile.
The ground Minimum Safe Altitude Warning (MSAW) was then triggered and the controller radioed the crew. The crew stated they did not hear this radio-communication. However, the crew initiated a go-around. The minimum radio-altimeter height was recorded at 6 ft above the ground, at 0.8 NM from the runway threshold.
A second approach was flown based on the same erroneous QNH, again resulting in an MSAW warning with ATC. This time the flight crew were able to see the runway and PAPI’s, corrected the flight path on final and then landed without further incident.

Weather reported about the time of the incident (1141Z):
LFPG 231100Z 25008KT 9999 SHRA SCT016 BKN028 19/14 Q1001 TEMPO 3500 SHRA SCT060CB
LFPG 231200Z 29010KT 5000 SHRA FEW010 BKN015 BKN028 FEW050CB 16/15 Q1001 TEMPO 3500 SHRA SCT060CB

Sources:

https://bea.aero/en/investigation-reports/notified-events/detail/serious-incident-to-the-airbus-a320-registered-9h-emu-operated-by-airhub-on-23-05-2022-at-paris-charles-de-gaulle-ad/
https://uk.flightaware.com/live/flight/9HEMU/history/20220523/0932Z/ESSA/LFPG

https://bea.aero/fileadmin/user_upload/BEA2022-0219_9H-EMU_preliminary_report_for_publication_EN_finalise.pdf

Location

Images:

Photo of 9H-EMU courtesy AirHistory.net


Palma de Mallorca (LEPA / LESJ / PMI)
14 June 2022; (c) Javier Rodríguez


Figure: BEA

Revision history:

Date/time Contributor Updates
03-Jun-2022 07:41 harro Added
03-Jun-2022 07:43 harro Updated [Time, Narrative]
11-Jul-2022 14:48 harro Updated [Total occupants, Source]
11-Jul-2022 15:53 harro Updated [Location, Narrative]
13-Jul-2022 08:54 harro Updated [Narrative, Photo]
13-Jul-2022 08:56 harro Updated [Category]

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Revv Aviation Named FBO Operator at Huron Regional Airport in South Dakota – Aviation Pros https://businessaviationnews.com/revv-aviation-named-fbo-operator-at-huron-regional-airport-in-south-dakota-aviation-pros/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526139 Versatile Single-Turboprop Design: The Story Of The Pilatus PC-12 – Simple Flying https://businessaviationnews.com/versatile-single-turboprop-design-the-story-of-the-pilatus-pc-12-simple-flying/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1297384 ProJet Seeks Injunction to Halt Second FBO at Leesburg Airport – Loudoun Now https://businessaviationnews.com/projet-seeks-injunction-to-halt-second-fbo-at-leesburg-airport-loudoun-now/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526141

Project Aviation this week filed for a Circuit Court injunction to stop the town government from allowing a second company to begin work as a fixed-base operator at Leesburg Executive Airport.

ProJet has served as a FBO at the airport since 2010. This month, a second business, Kuhn Jet Center, also is expected to begin offering those services. 

While ProJet’s FBO status is not exclusive, the court filing argues that its 2015 lease with the town mandates that any other FBO would have to comply with the same terms and conditions placed on ProJet. Most significantly, that includes providing 10,000-square-feet of hangar space for maintenance operations.

While the petition describes that requirement as onerous and above typical airport standards, it argues that the Kuhn operation must be required to provide the same service. 

“Unless a new entrant can comply with the requirements imposed on ProJet under the Contract, the new entrant cannot be permitted to act as an FBO at the airport,” the petition states. It alleges Kuhn’s operation plan is “far more favorable” and also alleges the business is being provided with access to public ramp space and operating a substandard and dangerous fueling system.

In arguing that there is not enough space for a second FBO to safely operate in the current facilities and also stating that it is not opposed to the competition a second FBO would bring, ProJet suggests the town establish those services on the west side of the airport, on land planned for expansion in the future.

The town has not yet approved the Kuhn Jet Center to operate as an FBO.

“We are aware of the litigation filed by ProJet Aviation. We understand that the Loudoun County Circuit Court has declined to hear the request for an emergency hearing on temporary injunctive relief. Until and unless the town is enjoined in the lawsuit it is business as usual,” Town Attorney Christopher Spera said in a statement. “The Airport Director is currently reviewing the permit application for Kuhn Jet Center to operate as a fixed-base operator at Leesburg Executive Airport. The Airport Director will issue a commercial operator permit to KJC when he determines they are in compliance with airport minimum standards.”

Scott Kuhn, the president and CEO of KJC, said the operations meet or exceed all state, local, and federal requirements to open the FBO and plans to begin offering services to the public this month.

“A thriving regional airport is in the best interest of our rapidly growing community. That starts with providing a competitive environment at Leesburg Executive Airport, including in its fueling and service business,” Kuhn said. “By opening Kuhn Jet Center—an FBO, we will help expand and grow the airport by bringing more options, a higher level of service, and fair pricing to customers. We are already doing this with Kuhn Aviation, our aircraft management business, and look forward to our continuing partnership with the Town of Leesburg. ProJet and its owners should focus on competing rather than preventing progress. Our county and region deserve it.”

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ECP officials approve lease for new airport expansion – WJHG https://businessaviationnews.com/ecp-officials-approve-lease-for-new-airport-expansion-wjhg/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526145

PANAMA CITY BEACH, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) – At a board meeting Wednesday morning, officials at Northwest Florida Beaches International airport made an announcement to expand. A lease amendment was approved for Southern Sky Aviation – a new fixed-base-operator, or FBO.

Right now, the only FBO at the airport is Sheltair Aviation.

FBO’s are private jet terminals, allowing aircrafts to operate a the airport and provide services such as fueling, parking, hangar space, and more. Officials said the expansion will help economic development in the area.

”This community does a great job promoting the beaches and so there’s increased tourism coming in and you also have increased industrial commitment, and so both of those things combined are increasing the traffic to this airport,” Southern Sky Aviation President Donald Howell said.

Officials said once construction plans are finalized, the real work can begin. If there are no delays, the project’s completion date will be December 2023.

Copyright 2022 WJHG. All rights reserved.

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Red Air MD-82 runway excursion accident at Miami https://businessaviationnews.com/red-air-md-82-runway-excursion-accident-at-miami/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 19:42:13 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1223126
Developing story –
the information presented here is preliminary and may change rapidly.

Narrative:
Red Air flight L5203, a McDonnell Douglas MD-82, HI1064, suffered a gear collapse and runway excursion during landing on runway 09 at Miami International Airport, FL.
A fire erupted in the right-hand wing but all on board managed to evacuate the aircraft.

Classification:

Landing gear collapse
Runway excursion

Sources:

» wsvn.com
» www.miamiherald.com
» Red Air statement

METAR Weather report:

20:53 UTC / 16:53 local time:
KMIA 212053Z COR 05010G18KT 10SM FEW030 BKN250 30/19 A3008 RMK AO2 SLP187 CB DSNT SE AND SW MOV S T03000194 $

21:53 UTC / 17:53 local time:
KMIA 212153Z 05009G16KT 10SM FEW030 FEW045 BKN250 30/16 A3008 RMK AO2 SLP187 T03000161 $

Photos


accident date: 21-06-2022
type: McDonnell Douglas MD-82
registration: HI1064

 

Video, social media

Aircraft history

18 December 1990 N16545 American Airlines delivered
12 August 2014 N16545 American Airlines withdrawn from use
28 May 2015 N16545 Aerothrust Holdings registered
7 Sep 2017 YV3367 LASER delivered
15 February 2021 HI1064 Red Air delivered

Map

This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Santo Domingo-Las Américas José Francisco Peña Gómez Int’l Airport to Miami International Airport, FL as the crow flies is 1358 km (849 miles).
Accident location: Exact; deduced from official accident report.

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.

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The trouble with private jets… – Financial Times https://businessaviationnews.com/the-trouble-with-private-jets-financial-times/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 03:56:36 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1158755 On 16 May, a New York State Supreme Court Justice issued a last-minute block on the planned closure of East Hampton Airport, forcing a stay of at least 10 days. The airport had been scheduled to transition to a private facility, owned and overseen by the town; and the town promptly wanted to begin imposing restrictions, including overnight curfews, reduced frequency of private-jet arrivals and a potential prohibition altogether on larger private planes. 

A ban on private jets – in the Hamptons. You can see how things would become, as they did, very snarly, very quickly. The infighting has raised everything from NIMBY concerns about the noise pollution that the rerouted planes and helicopters would bring to, say, Montauk (which also has an airport), to face-offs between UNHWIs used to dropping in whenever they want on mega-jets and the merely-very-rich locals worried about damage to the foundations of their historic shingled houses by the constant seismic rumblings (it has been reported that in high summer a helicopter or plane takes off about every 90 seconds).

The battle reveals how diffuse private-charter air travel has become among the wealthy, particularly in North America and Europe. Despite the re-emergence of major commercial airlines and their premium-class offerings, flying private (or business aviation, as the industry calls it) is not just here to stay, it’s growing at a healthy clip: the market’s compound annual growth rate between 2022 and 2026 is conservatively projected in the high-single digits; the first five months of 2022 have seen double-digit increases. Individual companies, meanwhile, report as much as 30 per cent increases over 2021.

It’s all down to a new class of private flyer – those who have discovered the joys of being unshackled from commercial-flight schedules and security queues, and of reducing their “touch points” (those moments that bring one into less-than-two-metres’-distance contact with the rest of humanity) from an average of hundreds to fewer than 30 per flight. They traded up to flying private during the pandemic for peace of mind; they’re sticking with it for the call-your-own-shots convenience, despite annual spends of $500,000 or more for fractional ownership, and entry-level membership fees as hefty as $80,000. According to business intelligence company WINGX, private flights now account for a quarter of all air traffic in the US – around twice what they did pre-pandemic.

Many of the converted subscribe to one, or several, jet-card services (a prepaid hourly balance, usually starting between 10 and 25 hours of flight time) that allow for whole charters or single seats across various routes. Most of the category leaders – NetJets, VistaJet and XO (both owned by Vista Global Holding), Wheels Up, Flexjet and their ilk – offer versions of both fractional aircraft ownership and jet-card subscriptions. Most have also been around for much of the past decade (NetJets, in its first iteration as Executive Jet Airways, dates back to 1964).

© Giacomo Gambineri

But the post-2021 landscape (skyscape?) has begotten a dicey combination of hyper-fuelled demand and stymied supply. Demand for new planes skyrocketed in early 2020, in parallel with the uptick in interest, and it hasn’t much let up since. But recent manufacturing challenges and delays in parts production mean inventory is taking longer to arrive. The market for used planes has consequently surged: according to Doug Gollan, founder of Private Jet Card Comparisons, the surplus that consistently characterised the industry for 13 years following the global financial crisis inverted to become a deficit last year (cue the deluge of headlines decrying a global private-jet “shortage”).

A former editor of Elite Traveler magazine, Gollan is currently involved in a paid-subscription advisory service that aggregates information from some 800 business-jet operators and brokers and rates them (like the Robert Parker guides, he jokes, but for PJs instead of premier cru vintages). “There are real capacity issues today,” Gollan says, “and it’s resulted in a lot of these jet-card services being stretched.” He notes that NetJets stopped selling jet cards and fractional shares in 2021; while its fractional sales are back online, jet-card sales and renewals are still suspended until the end of 2022, leaving those buyers relying on other jet cards in the meantime. “Take the [Embraer] Phenom 300, which is the NetJets entry-level light jet: if you order one today, it won’t arrive until probably Q1 2024,” he says.

Delayed delivery is only one of the hurdles. Staff shortages – of pilots, maintenance technicians and flight attendants, who are being aggressively courted by rebounding commercial airlines as well as within the compset – mean even category leaders are working with limited fleets; Gollan suggests that some are occasionally resorting to booking clients onto competitors’ planes to meet contractual obligations. “I know fractional owners who’ve bought at least one jet-card membership. And some who own their own planes outright have lost their pilots [to business-jet or commercial fleets],” he says, so opt for “supplementary” jet-card subscriptions as well. “I’d say around 70 per cent of my subscribers now have more than one private-aviation solution.”

Some flyers use brokers alongside, or in lieu of, contracting directly with the companies. Most of them sell one-off flights from multiple services; some also sell jet-card programmes. “Then you have boutique brokers who handle just six or seven clients,” Gollan says. “They’re like wealth advisers.” But even these are struggling with the supply-demand conundrum, with prices for single flights having increased by as much as 30 or 40 per cent over previous months.

The multitude of challenges doesn’t seem to be making a dent on either side of the Atlantic, however, if the thousands who now habitually crisscross it, Logan Roy-style – or hit Cabo San Lucas from LA, or Jackson Hole from New York, or any number of second-tier cities from America’s apparently quite cashed-up “flyover” middle – are any indication. Emily FitzRoy, founder and director of UK-based Italian travel specialists Bellini Travel, estimates that in 2022 about 80 per cent of her clients will fly private into the country, a new norm that has resulted in her having cultivated a deep expertise of Italy’s major military airports. “You can, of course, land at any of the commercial terminals – which isn’t nearly as glamorous,” she says drily. “Venice’s private terminal is the best by miles” – not surprisingly, given its regular influx of festival and Biennale habitués; “you get off the plane and you’re straight onto the water.” (FitzRoy has keys to its private dock, which only a handful of specialists can access.)

Another New York-based travel company CEO says that for his clients, the private-jet option is now mostly about frequent Euro-city hopping. “That was less the case [during the pandemic], when it was more the harder-to-reach places.” 

Thomas Flohr is founder and chairman of Vista Global Holdings, which owns VistaJet (founded in 2004) as well as XO, and which in April of this year acquired Jet Edge, the LA-based charterers/brokers of large-cabin and super-midsize jets. That acquisition, plus an ambitious order of ultra-long-range Bombardier Global 7500 and Challenger 350 jets, will bring Vista Global’s total fleet to more than 300 by the end of the year – putting it on track to potentially become second in the market (NetJets, owned by Berkshire Hathaway, remains number one).

Flohr is bullish about every aspect of his company’s future, from the scaling of long-haul to selling travel expertise and VIP experiences. He’s vocally proud of its shiny new long-range planes: “VistaJet members were the first to have access to the [Bombardier] Global 7500, giving them the ability to travel for example from Silicon Valley to Singapore with jet-lag-reducing technology,” he says. “This is game-changing, up to 17 hours non-stop.” He cites several other recent member-requested flights – São Paulo to the Maldives (16 hours), Dubai to New York (15 hours and change) – to support the investment in the 7500s, 17 of which he intends to add to the fleet by the end of the year.

Just as interesting – if a little more leftfield – is the new trend for selling remarkable events, experiences and places, both in the air and on the ground. Last month, Flexjet commandeered a series of ultra-luxurious private lounges for its owners during Miami’s first-ever Formula 1 Grand Prix. “More and more, we’re seeing jet owners travelling to sporting events like this one,” said COO Megan Wolf. Offering hospitality to them seemed both “inspired” and elementary. In mid-May, VistaJet announced a partnership with Frieze that made the pre-fair viewing room available across its fleet; curators virtually “chaperoned” members through the galleries mid-flight, on screens at 40,000 feet.

This followed the announcement in December 2021 of VistaJet’s full Private World Journeys series – partnerships with elite travel operators to create exclusive itineraries booked directly (and only) through VistaJet. Members can dive with sharks in the Bahamas, or shadow nomads in the Altai Mountains in Mongolia. They can sail the world’s longest fjord (Greenland, not Norway) aboard the expedition yacht Nansen Explorer, complete with choppers for heliskiing pristine slopes; or glamp on a beach in Mozambique at the €5,000-a-night Kisawa resort (which happens to be owned by Flohr’s 35-year-old daughter Nina). 

“We launched in October 2020,” says Flohr. “It took us more than two years to build this programme, with a global pandemic in parallel and the travel industry business model forced to make a shift – where success is no longer about volumes of booking, but rather quality and trust.”

Lofty words for a lofty vision. When I ask Gollan, the numbers guy, what he thinks of these initiatives, he’s somewhere between cynical and circumspect. “Optics,” he speculates. The meat and potatoes of people’s choices is still down to what they get when they fly, he says; and now more than ever, on availability, whatever the destination – Wyoming or West Papua. Or East Hampton, where at time of press the snarls are still largely yet to be unravelled, though the airport’s official call letters have been changed by the FAA. Best ensure your pilot is updated – if you can find one.

Data visualisation by Steven Bernard

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GlobalAir Upgrades Airport Resource Center – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/globalair-upgrades-airport-resource-center-aviation-international-news/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526149

The GlobalAir Airport Resource Center (ARC) has been updated to make it easier to use. With fuel prices, FBO and airport business information, aviation weather, and FAA airport data, the ARC’s new interface helps dispatchers and pilots work more efficiently.

FBOs are now easier to find on the site with its new targeted-mapping feature, which shows precise FBO locations at airports. Another new feature is a tab with information on local places of interest. “In our research, we heard from a lot of pilots who wanted the ability to find nearby attractions they could visit during the periods they might be waiting to fly a client,” said GlobalAir CFO Elise Carrithers.

GlobalAir users can submit comments on FBOs, and FBOs can respond to the comments. Last year, the company added SAF pricing for FBOs that want to report information on sustainable fuel. Now GlobalAir’s interactive tool that lists the 10 lowest FBO fuel prices in the U.S. also includes SAF prices.

Other features that have been updated include the flight-time calculator; the airports tab with nearby restaurant, hotel, and golf course information; the airport business directory; and the FBO fuel locator map for comparing prices in a specified nautical-mile radius around an airport.

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Flexjet Redefines Private Travel by Adding Private Helicopter Division Featuring Sikorsky S-76s – KULR-TV https://businessaviationnews.com/flexjet-redefines-private-travel-by-adding-private-helicopter-division-featuring-sikorsky-s-76s-kulr-tv/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 13:07:44 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1081712

CLEVELAND–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jun 2, 2022–

Flexjet LLC, one of the largest and most innovative fractional jet providers, today launched its private helicopter division, integrating Associated Aircraft Group (AAG), which was acquired by parent Directional Aviation, into the Flexjet family. Flexjet will extend complimentary helicopter hours to its Gulfstream G650 fractional Owners, and will sell add-on fractional, lease and charter access in Flexjet-branded Sikorsky S-76 helicopters. The new division will provide on-demand transportation regionally as well as last-mile transport for Owners of Flexjet aircraft traveling from airports to their final destinations, a unique door-to-door travel solution not available through any other provider in the U.S.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en/

Flexjet will extend complimentary helicopter hours to its Gulfstream G650 fractional Owners, and will sell add-on fractional, lease and charter access in Flexjet-branded Sikorsky S-76 helicopters. (Photo: Business Wire)

Flexjet’s Eli Flint has been promoted to President of the Flexjet private helicopter division, leading the nearly 50 former AAG sales managers, mechanics, operations team members and pilots. He brings more than 25 years of aviation experience to this new role. The division is expected to grow domestically and in Europe over the next five years as point-to-point vertical aviation demand increases worldwide.

“Flexjet’s new helicopter division enhances our position as the leader in combining fixed-wing operations and private urban mobility in the U.S. This distinguishes us as the only operator in our industry to offer seamless travel,” said Flexjet Chief Executive Officer Michael Silvestro. “Today, more and more travelers are seeking an alternative to crowded forms of transportation – opting instead for easier, safer and less stressful options from beginning to end. In addition, this enhanced segment of the Flexjet experience allows our clients to become even more productive with their time.”

Born out of the innovation of Red Label, Flexjet’s private helicopter division is the next revolutionary step in offering private aviation solutions for the world’s most discerning travelers. Flexjet will reimagine what private aviation travel can be – from the safety of flying managed fleets to the packaging of end-to-end flight solutions – offering a differentiator in the fractional jet market competitors will not be able to duplicate. In addition, Flexjet’s helicopter operations will be environmentally responsible: The company upholds a 4AIR Bronze Sustainability + SAF (Sustainable Aviation Fuel) Rating.

The Flexjet fleet will now include the Sikorsky S-76, one of the most respected and longest running-production helicopters, with a heritage of more than 40 years and 7.5 million hours of safe flight. These private helicopters will be outfitted with a seating configuration for up to six passengers plus two pilots. The aircraft can fly at 155 knots per hour and has a range of 300 nautical miles.

Flexjet helicopter operations will be seasonally located in the Northeastern states and in Florida throughout the year providing connections between airports and city centers as well as short-haul regional destinations such as conventions, music festivals and other sport and entertainment events.

“I know how important this time-saving program will be to Flexjet’s busy fractional jet Owners and I am proud to lead this group of aviation professionals,” said Flint, who is type rated in several business jets and until recently was a leader in private jet sales for Flexjet working in the Southeast market. “I also want to assure our Owners that, since safety is the highest priority at Flexjet, the helicopter division will have the same level of oversight, resources and industry credentials as our jet fleet.”

Some helicopter safety elements include:

  • Each helicopter has a series of double redundancies for enhanced safety with twin engines, dual autopilot systems and two S-76-certified, highly trained Flexjet pilots.
  • The helicopter Safety Management System (SMS), through Baldwin Safety, includes a preflight risk assessment program, a hazard reporting system and a customized landing zone survey conducted for off-airport operations, allowing Owners additional flexibility in their flying.
  • The helicopter division has the same operational oversights for weather and performance planning as Flexjet’s jet program, with conservative margins designed for safety and peace of mind.

About Flexjet

Flexjet first entered the fractional jet ownership market in 1995. Flexjet offers fractional jet ownership and leasing. Flexjet’s fractional aircraft program is the first in the world to be recognized as achieving the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s Industry Audit Standard, is the first and only company to be honored with 22 FAA Diamond Awards for Excellence, upholds an ARG/US Platinum Safety Rating, a 4Air Bronze Sustainable Rating, is IS-BAO compliant at Level 2 and achieved active voluntary conformance with the FAA’s Safety Management System. Flexjet’s fractional program fields an exclusive array of business aircraft—some of the youngest in the fractional jet industry, with an average age of approximately six years. In 2015, Flexjet introduced Red Label by Flexjet, which features the youngest fleet in the industry, flight crews dedicated to a single aircraft and the LXi Cabin Collection of interiors. To date there are more than 40 different interior designs across its fleet, which includes the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500, Bombardier Challenger 350, the Gulfstream G450 and 650. Flexjet’s European fleet includes the Embraer Legacy 500, Praetor 600. Flexjet’s private helicopter division sells fractional, lease, and on-demand charter access to its fleet of owned and operated Sikorsky S-76 private helicopters serving locations throughout the Northeastern United States and Florida. Flexjet is a member of the Directional Aviation family of companies. For more details on innovative programs and flexible offerings, visit www.flexjet.com or follow us on Twitter @Flexjet and on Instagram @FlexjetLLC.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en/

CONTACT: Nicholas Parmelee

The Hubbell Group, Inc.

216-406-5602 (mobile)

781-878-8882 (office)

nparmelee@hubbellgroup.com

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA OHIO

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: AIR TRANSPORT AEROSPACE MANUFACTURING TRANSPORTATION TRAVEL

SOURCE: Flexjet LLC

Copyright Business Wire 2022.

PUB: 06/02/2022 09:07 AM/DISC: 06/02/2022 09:07 AM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en

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Flexjet Redefines Private Travel by Adding Private Helicopter Division Featuring Sikorsky S-76s – Valdosta Daily Times https://businessaviationnews.com/flexjet-redefines-private-travel-by-adding-private-helicopter-division-featuring-sikorsky-s-76s-valdosta-daily-times/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 13:07:44 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1157822

#inform-video-player-1 .inform-embed { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }

#inform-video-player-2 .inform-embed { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }

CLEVELAND–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jun 2, 2022–

Flexjet LLC, one of the largest and most innovative fractional jet providers, today launched its private helicopter division, integrating Associated Aircraft Group (AAG), which was acquired by parent Directional Aviation, into the Flexjet family. Flexjet will extend complimentary helicopter hours to its Gulfstream G650 fractional Owners, and will sell add-on fractional, lease and charter access in Flexjet-branded Sikorsky S-76 helicopters. The new division will provide on-demand transportation regionally as well as last-mile transport for Owners of Flexjet aircraft traveling from airports to their final destinations, a unique door-to-door travel solution not available through any other provider in the U.S.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en/

Flexjet will extend complimentary helicopter hours to its Gulfstream G650 fractional Owners, and will sell add-on fractional, lease and charter access in Flexjet-branded Sikorsky S-76 helicopters. (Photo: Business Wire)

Flexjet’s Eli Flint has been promoted to President of the Flexjet private helicopter division, leading the nearly 50 former AAG sales managers, mechanics, operations team members and pilots. He brings more than 25 years of aviation experience to this new role. The division is expected to grow domestically and in Europe over the next five years as point-to-point vertical aviation demand increases worldwide.

“Flexjet’s new helicopter division enhances our position as the leader in combining fixed-wing operations and private urban mobility in the U.S. This distinguishes us as the only operator in our industry to offer seamless travel,” said Flexjet Chief Executive Officer Michael Silvestro. “Today, more and more travelers are seeking an alternative to crowded forms of transportation – opting instead for easier, safer and less stressful options from beginning to end. In addition, this enhanced segment of the Flexjet experience allows our clients to become even more productive with their time.”

Born out of the innovation of Red Label, Flexjet’s private helicopter division is the next revolutionary step in offering private aviation solutions for the world’s most discerning travelers. Flexjet will reimagine what private aviation travel can be – from the safety of flying managed fleets to the packaging of end-to-end flight solutions – offering a differentiator in the fractional jet market competitors will not be able to duplicate. In addition, Flexjet’s helicopter operations will be environmentally responsible: The company upholds a 4AIR Bronze Sustainability + SAF (Sustainable Aviation Fuel) Rating.

The Flexjet fleet will now include the Sikorsky S-76, one of the most respected and longest running-production helicopters, with a heritage of more than 40 years and 7.5 million hours of safe flight. These private helicopters will be outfitted with a seating configuration for up to six passengers plus two pilots. The aircraft can fly at 155 knots per hour and has a range of 300 nautical miles.

Flexjet helicopter operations will be seasonally located in the Northeastern states and in Florida throughout the year providing connections between airports and city centers as well as short-haul regional destinations such as conventions, music festivals and other sport and entertainment events.

“I know how important this time-saving program will be to Flexjet’s busy fractional jet Owners and I am proud to lead this group of aviation professionals,” said Flint, who is type rated in several business jets and until recently was a leader in private jet sales for Flexjet working in the Southeast market. “I also want to assure our Owners that, since safety is the highest priority at Flexjet, the helicopter division will have the same level of oversight, resources and industry credentials as our jet fleet.”

Some helicopter safety elements include:

  • Each helicopter has a series of double redundancies for enhanced safety with twin engines, dual autopilot systems and two S-76-certified, highly trained Flexjet pilots.
  • The helicopter Safety Management System (SMS), through Baldwin Safety, includes a preflight risk assessment program, a hazard reporting system and a customized landing zone survey conducted for off-airport operations, allowing Owners additional flexibility in their flying.
  • The helicopter division has the same operational oversights for weather and performance planning as Flexjet’s jet program, with conservative margins designed for safety and peace of mind.

About Flexjet

Flexjet first entered the fractional jet ownership market in 1995. Flexjet offers fractional jet ownership and leasing. Flexjet’s fractional aircraft program is the first in the world to be recognized as achieving the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s Industry Audit Standard, is the first and only company to be honored with 22 FAA Diamond Awards for Excellence, upholds an ARG/US Platinum Safety Rating, a 4Air Bronze Sustainable Rating, is IS-BAO compliant at Level 2 and achieved active voluntary conformance with the FAA’s Safety Management System. Flexjet’s fractional program fields an exclusive array of business aircraft—some of the youngest in the fractional jet industry, with an average age of approximately six years. In 2015, Flexjet introduced Red Label by Flexjet, which features the youngest fleet in the industry, flight crews dedicated to a single aircraft and the LXi Cabin Collection of interiors. To date there are more than 40 different interior designs across its fleet, which includes the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500, Bombardier Challenger 350, the Gulfstream G450 and 650. Flexjet’s European fleet includes the Embraer Legacy 500, Praetor 600. Flexjet’s private helicopter division sells fractional, lease, and on-demand charter access to its fleet of owned and operated Sikorsky S-76 private helicopters serving locations throughout the Northeastern United States and Florida. Flexjet is a member of the Directional Aviation family of companies. For more details on innovative programs and flexible offerings, visit www.flexjet.com or follow us on Twitter @Flexjet and on Instagram @FlexjetLLC.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en/

CONTACT: Nicholas Parmelee

The Hubbell Group, Inc.

216-406-5602 (mobile)

781-878-8882 (office)

nparmelee@hubbellgroup.com

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA OHIO

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: AIR TRANSPORT AEROSPACE MANUFACTURING TRANSPORTATION TRAVEL

SOURCE: Flexjet LLC

Copyright Business Wire 2022.

PUB: 06/02/2022 09:07 AM/DISC: 06/02/2022 09:07 AM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en

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Flexjet Redefines Private Travel by Adding Private Helicopter Division Featuring Sikorsky S-76s – Joplin Globe https://businessaviationnews.com/flexjet-redefines-private-travel-by-adding-private-helicopter-division-featuring-sikorsky-s-76s-joplin-globe/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 13:07:40 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1082009

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CLEVELAND–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jun 2, 2022–

Flexjet LLC, one of the largest and most innovative fractional jet providers, today launched its private helicopter division, integrating Associated Aircraft Group (AAG), which was acquired by parent Directional Aviation, into the Flexjet family. Flexjet will extend complimentary helicopter hours to its Gulfstream G650 fractional Owners, and will sell add-on fractional, lease and charter access in Flexjet-branded Sikorsky S-76 helicopters. The new division will provide on-demand transportation regionally as well as last-mile transport for Owners of Flexjet aircraft traveling from airports to their final destinations, a unique door-to-door travel solution not available through any other provider in the U.S.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en/

Flexjet will extend complimentary helicopter hours to its Gulfstream G650 fractional Owners, and will sell add-on fractional, lease and charter access in Flexjet-branded Sikorsky S-76 helicopters. (Photo: Business Wire)

Flexjet’s Eli Flint has been promoted to President of the Flexjet private helicopter division, leading the nearly 50 former AAG sales managers, mechanics, operations team members and pilots. He brings more than 25 years of aviation experience to this new role. The division is expected to grow domestically and in Europe over the next five years as point-to-point vertical aviation demand increases worldwide.

“Flexjet’s new helicopter division enhances our position as the leader in combining fixed-wing operations and private urban mobility in the U.S. This distinguishes us as the only operator in our industry to offer seamless travel,” said Flexjet Chief Executive Officer Michael Silvestro. “Today, more and more travelers are seeking an alternative to crowded forms of transportation – opting instead for easier, safer and less stressful options from beginning to end. In addition, this enhanced segment of the Flexjet experience allows our clients to become even more productive with their time.”

Born out of the innovation of Red Label, Flexjet’s private helicopter division is the next revolutionary step in offering private aviation solutions for the world’s most discerning travelers. Flexjet will reimagine what private aviation travel can be – from the safety of flying managed fleets to the packaging of end-to-end flight solutions – offering a differentiator in the fractional jet market competitors will not be able to duplicate. In addition, Flexjet’s helicopter operations will be environmentally responsible: The company upholds a 4AIR Bronze Sustainability + SAF (Sustainable Aviation Fuel) Rating.

The Flexjet fleet will now include the Sikorsky S-76, one of the most respected and longest running-production helicopters, with a heritage of more than 40 years and 7.5 million hours of safe flight. These private helicopters will be outfitted with a seating configuration for up to six passengers plus two pilots. The aircraft can fly at 155 knots per hour and has a range of 300 nautical miles.

Flexjet helicopter operations will be seasonally located in the Northeastern states and in Florida throughout the year providing connections between airports and city centers as well as short-haul regional destinations such as conventions, music festivals and other sport and entertainment events.

“I know how important this time-saving program will be to Flexjet’s busy fractional jet Owners and I am proud to lead this group of aviation professionals,” said Flint, who is type rated in several business jets and until recently was a leader in private jet sales for Flexjet working in the Southeast market. “I also want to assure our Owners that, since safety is the highest priority at Flexjet, the helicopter division will have the same level of oversight, resources and industry credentials as our jet fleet.”

Some helicopter safety elements include:

  • Each helicopter has a series of double redundancies for enhanced safety with twin engines, dual autopilot systems and two S-76-certified, highly trained Flexjet pilots.
  • The helicopter Safety Management System (SMS), through Baldwin Safety, includes a preflight risk assessment program, a hazard reporting system and a customized landing zone survey conducted for off-airport operations, allowing Owners additional flexibility in their flying.
  • The helicopter division has the same operational oversights for weather and performance planning as Flexjet’s jet program, with conservative margins designed for safety and peace of mind.

About Flexjet

Flexjet first entered the fractional jet ownership market in 1995. Flexjet offers fractional jet ownership and leasing. Flexjet’s fractional aircraft program is the first in the world to be recognized as achieving the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s Industry Audit Standard, is the first and only company to be honored with 22 FAA Diamond Awards for Excellence, upholds an ARG/US Platinum Safety Rating, a 4Air Bronze Sustainable Rating, is IS-BAO compliant at Level 2 and achieved active voluntary conformance with the FAA’s Safety Management System. Flexjet’s fractional program fields an exclusive array of business aircraft—some of the youngest in the fractional jet industry, with an average age of approximately six years. In 2015, Flexjet introduced Red Label by Flexjet, which features the youngest fleet in the industry, flight crews dedicated to a single aircraft and the LXi Cabin Collection of interiors. To date there are more than 40 different interior designs across its fleet, which includes the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500, Bombardier Challenger 350, the Gulfstream G450 and 650. Flexjet’s European fleet includes the Embraer Legacy 500, Praetor 600. Flexjet’s private helicopter division sells fractional, lease, and on-demand charter access to its fleet of owned and operated Sikorsky S-76 private helicopters serving locations throughout the Northeastern United States and Florida. Flexjet is a member of the Directional Aviation family of companies. For more details on innovative programs and flexible offerings, visit www.flexjet.com or follow us on Twitter @Flexjet and on Instagram @FlexjetLLC.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en/

CONTACT: Nicholas Parmelee

The Hubbell Group, Inc.

216-406-5602 (mobile)

781-878-8882 (office)

nparmelee@hubbellgroup.com

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA OHIO

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: AIR TRANSPORT AEROSPACE MANUFACTURING TRANSPORTATION TRAVEL

SOURCE: Flexjet LLC

Copyright Business Wire 2022.

PUB: 06/02/2022 09:07 AM/DISC: 06/02/2022 09:07 AM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005542/en

#inform-video-player-3 .inform-embed { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }

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Flexjet Redefines Private Travel by Adding Private Helicopter Division Featuring Sikorsky S-76s – Business Wire https://businessaviationnews.com/flexjet-redefines-private-travel-by-adding-private-helicopter-division-featuring-sikorsky-s-76s-business-wire/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1195681

CLEVELAND–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Flexjet LLC, one of the largest and most innovative fractional jet providers, today launched its private helicopter division, integrating Associated Aircraft Group (AAG), which was acquired by parent Directional Aviation, into the Flexjet family. Flexjet will extend complimentary helicopter hours to its Gulfstream G650 fractional Owners, and will sell add-on fractional, lease and charter access in Flexjet-branded Sikorsky S-76 helicopters. The new division will provide on-demand transportation regionally as well as last-mile transport for Owners of Flexjet aircraft traveling from airports to their final destinations, a unique door-to-door travel solution not available through any other provider in the U.S.

Flexjet’s Eli Flint has been promoted to President of the Flexjet private helicopter division, leading the nearly 50 former AAG sales managers, mechanics, operations team members and pilots. He brings more than 25 years of aviation experience to this new role. The division is expected to grow domestically and in Europe over the next five years as point-to-point vertical aviation demand increases worldwide.

“Flexjet’s new helicopter division enhances our position as the leader in combining fixed-wing operations and private urban mobility in the U.S. This distinguishes us as the only operator in our industry to offer seamless travel,” said Flexjet Chief Executive Officer Michael Silvestro. “Today, more and more travelers are seeking an alternative to crowded forms of transportation – opting instead for easier, safer and less stressful options from beginning to end. In addition, this enhanced segment of the Flexjet experience allows our clients to become even more productive with their time.”

Born out of the innovation of Red Label, Flexjet’s private helicopter division is the next revolutionary step in offering private aviation solutions for the world’s most discerning travelers. Flexjet will reimagine what private aviation travel can be – from the safety of flying managed fleets to the packaging of end-to-end flight solutions – offering a differentiator in the fractional jet market competitors will not be able to duplicate. In addition, Flexjet’s helicopter operations will be environmentally responsible: The company upholds a 4AIR Bronze Sustainability + SAF (Sustainable Aviation Fuel) Rating.

The Flexjet fleet will now include the Sikorsky S-76, one of the most respected and longest running-production helicopters, with a heritage of more than 40 years and 7.5 million hours of safe flight. These private helicopters will be outfitted with a seating configuration for up to six passengers plus two pilots. The aircraft can fly at 155 knots per hour and has a range of 300 nautical miles.

Flexjet helicopter operations will be seasonally located in the Northeastern states and in Florida throughout the year providing connections between airports and city centers as well as short-haul regional destinations such as conventions, music festivals and other sport and entertainment events.

“I know how important this time-saving program will be to Flexjet’s busy fractional jet Owners and I am proud to lead this group of aviation professionals,” said Flint, who is type rated in several business jets and until recently was a leader in private jet sales for Flexjet working in the Southeast market. “I also want to assure our Owners that, since safety is the highest priority at Flexjet, the helicopter division will have the same level of oversight, resources and industry credentials as our jet fleet.”

Some helicopter safety elements include:

  • Each helicopter has a series of double redundancies for enhanced safety with twin engines, dual autopilot systems and two S-76-certified, highly trained Flexjet pilots.
  • The helicopter Safety Management System (SMS), through Baldwin Safety, includes a preflight risk assessment program, a hazard reporting system and a customized landing zone survey conducted for off-airport operations, allowing Owners additional flexibility in their flying.
  • The helicopter division has the same operational oversights for weather and performance planning as Flexjet’s jet program, with conservative margins designed for safety and peace of mind.

About Flexjet

Flexjet first entered the fractional jet ownership market in 1995. Flexjet offers fractional jet ownership and leasing. Flexjet’s fractional aircraft program is the first in the world to be recognized as achieving the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s Industry Audit Standard, is the first and only company to be honored with 22 FAA Diamond Awards for Excellence, upholds an ARG/US Platinum Safety Rating, a 4Air Bronze Sustainable Rating, is IS-BAO compliant at Level 2 and achieved active voluntary conformance with the FAA’s Safety Management System. Flexjet’s fractional program fields an exclusive array of business aircraft—some of the youngest in the fractional jet industry, with an average age of approximately six years. In 2015, Flexjet introduced Red Label by Flexjet, which features the youngest fleet in the industry, flight crews dedicated to a single aircraft and the LXi Cabin Collection of interiors. To date there are more than 40 different interior designs across its fleet, which includes the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500, Bombardier Challenger 350, the Gulfstream G450 and 650. Flexjet’s European fleet includes the Embraer Legacy 500, Praetor 600. Flexjet’s private helicopter division sells fractional, lease, and on-demand charter access to its fleet of owned and operated Sikorsky S-76 private helicopters serving locations throughout the Northeastern United States and Florida. Flexjet is a member of the Directional Aviation family of companies. For more details on innovative programs and flexible offerings, visit www.flexjet.com or follow us on Twitter @Flexjet and on Instagram @FlexjetLLC.

]]>
APP Jet Center acquires FBO operations at Witham Field Airport – Business Airport International https://businessaviationnews.com/app-jet-center-acquires-fbo-operations-at-witham-field-airport-business-airport-international/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526153

APP Jet Center, a fixed–base operator that owns and operates aviation infrastructure, has announced the acquisition of FBO operations at Witham Field Airport in Stuart, Florida.

The acquisition comes as part of a company-wide focus on enhancing its platform through a combination of organic growth initiatives and complementary acquisitions.

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APP CEO Dan Harrow said, “We are delighted to be integrating Stuart into APP’s growing network of FBO locations. We have been operating along Florida’s Treasure Coast for many years and have first-hand knowledge of the explosive growth for general aviation in South Florida.”

APP is making new infrastructure and other services available at its FBO locations. These will complement existing operations in  Washington DCDenver, ColoradoFort Pierce, Florida, and San Francisco, California.

Harrow said, “APP will continue to ensure that discerning customers at Stuart and our other FBO locations receive world-class service every day, with a focus on safe, secure, and sustainable operations.”

]]>
Report: Cause of Cessna 560 in-flight separation of engine cowlings unclear https://businessaviationnews.com/report-cause-of-cessna-560-in-flight-separation-of-engine-cowlings-unclear/ Fri, 27 May 2022 06:23:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1033939

Narrative:
A Cessna 560 Citation Encore airplane, N654CE, was substantially damaged when two engine cowlings departed the airplane inflight over Benbrook, Texas. The pilot and the one passenger were not injured.
The airplane was climbing through flight level (FL) 225 for FL 380, when the pilot heard a “loud crashing noise” followed by a “turbulent air sound” he described as similar to flying with the main landing gear extended. At time of the initial noise, the pilot reported the airplane was on a heading of 255, the airspeed was about 265 to 270 kts, and the autopilot system was engaged. The autopilot system was set to lateral navigation and the vertical speed was set for 1,500 ft per minute for climbing.
The pilot reacted to the initial noise by disconnecting the autopilot system, announcing the issue to air traffic control (ATC), slowing down the airplane to 170 kts, and descending to 11,000 ft above mean sea level. There were no master caution or warning lights illuminated on the cockpit annunciation panel. The pilot initially thought the airplane had a main landing gear malfunction based of the sound of the airflow around the cabin. The pilot slowed the airplane further, cycled the main landing gear, cycled the flaps, and moved the flight controls. He reported everything checked out normal except the “turbulent air sound” which was exacerbated with rudder movement. The pilot decided the main landing gear was functioning normally and there was a problem with the empennage.

The pilot located the closest airport with a paved runway greater than a 5,000 ft length, contacted ATC, and proceeded to land at the Mineral Wells Airport (MWL), Texas. The pilot executed an uneventful landing at 15:45 and shutdown the airplane without further incident.
A post landing inspection revealed the top and bottom cowling for the number 2 (right) engine were missing.
A portion of the separated cowlings was found wrapped around the inboard section of the right horizontal stabilizer. A portion of the separated cowlings impacted the area between the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer and the top of the fuselage, resulting in substantial damage. The remaining pieces of the separated cowlings have not been recovered.
On-scene examination revealed that receptacle 29, at the forward inboard side of the lower cowl door, was missing its stud, snap ring, and grommet and that receptacles 26 and 28 were missing their grommets and snap rings but had retained their studs.

The most likely cause of the cowl door departure is that either the stud at receptacle 29 was left unlocked when the cowl door was attached, or an oversized stud was used at receptacle 29 that was able to rotate from the locked to unlocked position. Without the stud to examine and additional on-wing testing, it cannot be determined whether the stud at that location was a longer grip-length stud or if spontaneous unlocking of a longer grip-length stud is an actual possibility.
The reason for the separation of the cowlings could not be determined because the stud in question was not recovered.

Probable Cause:

Probable Cause: The in-flight separation of the upper and lower right engine cowlings for reasons that could not be determined based on available evidence.

Accident investigation:

Investigating agency:  NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration:  2 years and 3 months
Accident number: CEN20LA082
Download report: Final report
Language:  English

Classification:

Loss/opening of engine cowling
Forced landing on runway

Photos


accident date: 12-02-2020
type: Cessna 560 Citation Encore
registration: N654CE

 

Map

This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Dallas-Love Field, TX to Midland International Air and Space Port, TX as the crow flies is 509 km (318 miles).

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.

]]>
Report: misinterpreted taxiway markings factor in attempted takeoff from taxiway, Amsterdam https://businessaviationnews.com/report-misinterpreted-taxiway-markings-factor-in-attempted-takeoff-from-taxiway-amsterdam/ Wed, 25 May 2022 10:16:09 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1021644

This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information.
If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date: 06-SEP-2019
Time: 06:10 LT
Type: Silhouette image of generic B738 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Boeing 737-8K2 (WL)
Owner/operator: Transavia
Registration: PH-HSJ
MSN: 42150/4810
Fatalities: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants:
Other fatalities: 0
Aircraft damage: None
Category: Serious incident
Location: Amsterdam-Schiphol Airport (AMS) –
  Netherlands

Phase: Take off
Nature: Passenger – Scheduled
Departure airport: Amsterdam-Schiphol International Airport (AMS/EHAM)
Destination airport: Chania-Soúda Airport (CHQ/LGSA)
Investigating agency:  Dutch Safety Board
Confidence Rating: Accident investigation report completed and information captured

Narrative:
Transavia flight HV1041, a Boeing 737-800, aborted the takeoff from a taxiway at Amsterdam-Schiphol Airport, Netherlands.
The flight crew, consisting of two pilots, was scheduled to fly from Schiphol Airport to Chania International Airport (LGSA) in Greece. During flight preparation, the flight crew planned and discussed the taxi route to and the takeoff from runway 18C. They made a performance calculation for a takeoff from Intersection W3. The first officer was the pilot flying.
At 06:03 hours, the ground controller issued the taxi clearance via Taxiways B and C to the holding point of runway 18C. The captain read back the clearance.
When the Boeing 737-800 entered taxiway C, there were no other aircraft in front of it.
At 06:08 hours the aircraft taxied north on taxiway C abeam W4, as the captain informed ground control they were approaching runway 18C and ready for departure.
The ground controller instructed the crew to contact the tower (runway controller). Because it was busy on the tower frequency, the captain could not immediately contact the runway controller and request the intersection takeoff from W3, which they had planned. The captain contacted the runway controller when the aircraft was near C2 at 06:09 hours and reported ready for departure.
The runway controller cleared the aircraft to line up at runway 18C and to take off. The captain read back the clearance and then asked if they could depart via W2, to which the runway controller replied that: ‘it is a long detour’. The captain apologised and reported that he meant W1. The aircraft continued north on taxiway C. When approaching C1, the pilots selected the departure chart on their Electronic Flight Bags.
The first officer turned left on C1, where the landing lights of the aircraft were switched on, and then made a second left turn, steering the aircraft onto taxiway D. The captain described the situation towards the runway as a ‘black hole’ without a stop bar and ‘wig-wag’ lights visible. He also stated that the runway identifier signs were not lit. After the aircraft had lined up on taxiway D, the first officer applied full throttle, engaged the autothrottle and began a rolling takeoff. At 06:10 hours, the captain made the 80 knots call, which was confirmed by the first officer.
The ground controller noticed the takeoff roll from the taxiway when he looked on his ground radar to see what the position was of another aircraft that was taxiing via taxiway C towards runway 18C for departure. He immediately informed the runway controller about it. The runway controller then looked at his ground radar straightaway and instructed the flight: takeoff: “Transavia one zero four one stop immediately, stop immediately, hold position.”
The aircraft’s position was then between W2 and W3. The captain took over the controls and initiated the procedure for a rejected takeoff. The aircraft came to a stop on the taxiway just south of W5.
Only after the runway controller had informed the pilots that they started their takeoff roll from the taxiway, the pilots realised what they had done. They were both completely astounded by what had just happened. The flight crew informed the cabin crew and passengers that they had rejected the takeoff due to a warning in the cockpit.
The pilots discussed what just had happened and judged that they were able to continue the flight despite the rejected takeoff.
The aircraft subsequently departed normally from runway 18C.

Safety Board Conclusions
In the morning darkness the flight crew interpreted Taxiway D as the designated Runway 18C and started the takeoff roll. They initiated the takeoff roll from a taxiway, because they had misinterpreted taxiway markings and environmental cues.
As Taxiway D was used for incoming traffic, air traffic control used parallel Taxiway C for the aeroplane to taxi to the holding point of Runway 18C. While taxiing on Taxiway C, the crew was not fully aware of the exact position of the aeroplane. The taxiway centre line markings did not provide continuous guidance; the yellow taxi line at C1 was uninterrupted towards Taxiway D and interrupted towards Runway 18C. The line became clearly visible when the crew switched on the landing lights. Following the only taxiway guidance that was clearly visible to the crew, i.e. the yellow line from C1, the aircraft ended up on Taxiway D. Cues such as the yellow, thin and continuous centre line marking and green centre line lights, were not recognised by the flight crew as cues of being on a taxiway. Environmental cues, such as signs indicating Runway 18C, enhanced the perception of the crew that they were lined up on Runway 18C, instead of on Taxiway D.

Several factors contributed to this serious incident:
• The use of outer Taxiway C in combination with an early issuance of the takeoff clearance, introduced a risk of taxiing incorrectly.
• The runway controller issued the takeoff clearance when prompted by the crew with a ready for departure notification. Thereafter he shifted his attention to other traffic and did not observe the line-up of the aeroplane on Taxiway D. Based upon the operational situation and his expert judgement, the runway controller did not perceive his reduced focus on the Boeing 737-800 as a risk, especially because it concerned a home based carrier.
• When taxiing from Taxiway C towards the holding position of Runway 18C, the taxiway centre line markings did not provide continuous guidance, as the design of these markings was focused on preventing runway incursions during low visibility operations.

Sources:

https://www.lvnl.nl/veiligheid/overzicht-voorvallen/dossiers/20190909-voorval-tijdens-start-schiphol
https://www.onderzoeksraad.nl/nl/page/15141/start-vanaf-taxibaan-boeing-737-amsterdam-airport-schiphol-6
https://www.liveatc.net/
https://www.flightradar24.com/2019-09-06/04:16/12x/TRA1041/21fd4fc6

Accident investigation:

   
Investigating agency:  Dutch Safety Board
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 2 years and 8 months
Download report: Final report

Location

Images:

Photo of PH-HSJ courtesy AirHistory.net


Amsterdam – Schiphol (EHAM / AMS)
28 June 2021; (c) Fred Willemsen


Taxi route of HV1041 from Flightradar24

Revision history:

Date/time Contributor Updates
13-Sep-2019 18:33 harro Added
17-Sep-2019 14:06 harro Updated [Aircraft type, Source, Narrative]
17-Sep-2019 14:44 harro Updated [Time, Aircraft type, Registration, Cn, Operator, Nature, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]
17-Sep-2019 15:01 harro Updated [Narrative, Photo]
17-Sep-2019 17:51 Anon Updated [Narrative]
25-May-2022 08:33 harro Updated [Narrative, Category, Accident report]
25-May-2022 09:47 harro Updated [Narrative]
25-May-2022 10:02 harro Updated [Photo]

]]>
Signature Opens New FBO at UK's Birmingham Airport – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/signature-opens-new-fbo-at-uks-birmingham-airport-aviation-international-news/ Tue, 24 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526157

Signature Flight Support (Booth K51) has opened its new FBO facility at the UK’s Birmingham Airport. The structure replaces the previous 1930’s-era terminal that was damaged by flooding in 2018.

The world’s largest private aviation service provider, Signature had been operating from a temporary facility until the opening of the new building. Construction took three months plus an additional month of interior finishing. The 222-sq-m (2,400-sq-ft) facility features a passenger lounge, refreshment bar, in-house security screening, pilot lounge, and electric vehicle charging station.

“The newly-built FBO in Birmingham reflects the resilience of our team and the importance of this location within our EMEA network,” said Daniel Myles, the company’s area director for the UK. “General aviation continues to be a commercial driver to both the airport and Birmingham city and we look forward to greeting attendees of the upcoming Commonwealth Games and Women’s UEFA Football Championship this summer.”

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AAIB: unstable approach factor in B737-400SF hard landing, Exeter https://businessaviationnews.com/aaib-unstable-approach-factor-in-b737-400sf-hard-landing-exeter/ Fri, 20 May 2022 08:39:12 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=984892

<!–

–>

Status: Accident investigation report completed and information captured
Date: Tuesday 19 January 2021
Time: 02:37
Type: Boeing 737-4Q8 (SF)
Operator: West Atlantic (UK)
Registration: G-JMCY
MSN: 25114/2666
First flight: 1994-10-20 (26 years 3 months)
Engines: 2 CFMI CFM56-3C1
Crew: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 2
Passengers: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 0
Total: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 2
Flight crew: Show flight crew age and flight hours

Crew member Flying hours Hours on type Age
Captain 15218 9000 56
First officer 19350 5637

Aircraft damage: Substantial
Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location: Exeter Airport (EXT) (   United Kingdom)
Phase: Landing (LDG)
Nature: Cargo
Departure airport: East Midlands Airport (EMA/EGNX), United Kingdom
Destination airport: Exeter Airport (EXT/EGTE), United Kingdom
Flightnumber: NPT05L

Narrative:
West Atlantic UK flight NPT05L, a Boeing 737-400 cargo plane, suffered substantial damage during a hard landing at Exeter Airport, U.K.
The takeoff and climb from East Midlands Airport (EMA) proceeded without event. During the cruise the crew independently calculated the landing performance. Runway 26 at Exeter Airport (EXT) was forecast to be wet, so they planned to use Flap 40 for the landing, with Autobrake 3. With both pilots being familiar with EXT the co-pilot, who was Pilot Flying (PF), conducted a short brief of the pertinent points for the approach.
From the ATIS they noted that the weather seemed to be better than forecast and the surface wind was from 230° at 11 kt. The ATC provided the flight crew with radar vectors from ATC to the ILS on Runway 26 at EXT.
The landing gear was lowered and Flap 25 selected before the aircraft intercepted the glideslope. Flap 40 (the landing flap) was selected on the glideslope just below 2000 ft amsl. With a calculated VREF of 134 kt and a surface wind of 10 kt the PF planned to fly the approach with a VAPP of 140 kt. At about 10 nm finals, upon looking at the flight management computer, the captain, who was Pilot Monitoring (PM), noticed there was a 30 kt headwind, so a VAPP of 144 kt was selected on the Mode Control Panel (MCP). The crew became visual with the runway at about 1000 ft aal. The PF then disconnected the Auto Pilot and Auto Throttle; the Flight Directors remained on.
As the wind was now starting to decrease, the VAPP was then reduced from 142 to 140 kt at about 600 ft aal.
As the wind reduced, towards the 10 kt surface wind, the PF made small adjustments to the power to maintain the IAS at or close to VAPP. At 500 ft radio altimeter (RA) the approach was declared stable by the crew, as per their standard operating procedures. At this point the aircraft had a pitch attitude of 2.5° nose down, the IAS was 143 kt, the rate of descent (ROD) was about 860 ft/min, the engines were operating at about 68% N1 and the aircraft was 0.4 dots above the glideslope. However, the ROD was increasing and soon thereafter was in excess of 1,150 ft/min. This was reduced to about 300 ft/min but soon increased again.
At 320 ft RA, the aircraft went below the glideslope for about 8 seconds and, with a ROD of 1,700 ft/min, a ‘SINK RATE’ GPWS alert was enunciated. The PF acknowledged this and corrected the flightpath to bring the aircraft back to the glideslope before stabilizing slightly above the glideslope; the PM called this deviation too. As the PF was correcting back to the glideslope the PM did not feel there was a need to take control. During this period the maximum recorded deviation was 3/4 of a dot below the glideslope.
At about 150 ft RA, with a ROD of 1,300 ft/min, there was a further ‘SINK RATE’ GPWS alert, to which the PM said, ‘watch that sink rate ‘, followed by another ‘Sink Rate’ alert, which the PF responded by saying ‘and back…’
The commander recalled that as the aircraft crossed the threshold, at about 100 ft, the PF retarded the throttles, pitched the aircraft nose down, from about 5° nose up to 4° nose down, and then applied some power in the last few feet. During these final moments before the landing, there was another ‘Sink Rate’ alert. The result was a hard landing. A ‘Pull Up’ warning was also triggered by the GPWS, but it was not audible on the CVR.
The last surface wind transmitted by ATC, just before the landing, was from 230° at 10 kt. During the rollout the commander took control, selected the thrust reversers and slowed down to taxi speed. After the aircraft had vacated the runway at Taxiway Bravo it became apparent the aircraft was listing to the left. During the After Landing checks the co-pilot tried to select Flaps Up, but they would not move. There was then a Hydraulic LP caution. As there was still brake accumulator pressure the crew were content to taxi the aircraft slowly the short distance onto Stand 10. Once on stand the listing became more obvious.
It was then that the crew realised there was something ‘seriously wrong’ with the� aircraft. After they had shut the aircraft down, the flight crew requested that the wheels were chocked, and the aircraft be connected to ground power before going outside to inspect the aircraft. Once outside a hydraulic leak was found. The fuselage skin aft of the wings was cracked and buckled, and the rear fuselage was distorted downward. The crown skin was creased and rippled along most of the fuselage. Both main landing gear shock absorbers were found to be bottomed, and the left main landing gear beam was distorted upwards such that the aircraft was approximately 2° left-wing low. he flap drive mechanism was damaged, and the left-wing inboard driveshaft was bent; the left inboard gearbox casing and its mountings were broken.
The maximum vertical acceleration recorded by the FDR on touchdown was 3.8g, at this point there was 3° of left roll.

Probable Cause:

Conclusion:
The aircraft suffered a hard landing as a result of the approach being continued after it became unstable after the aircraft had past the point where the crew had declared the approach stable and continued. Despite high rates of descent being observed beyond the stable point, together with associated alerts the crew elected to continue to land. Had the approach been discontinued and a GA flown, even at a low height, while the aircraft may have touched down the damage sustained may have been lessened.
While the OM did not specifically state that an approach was to remain stable beyond the gate on the approach, the FCTM was specific that, if it did not remain stable, a GA should be initiated.
The commander may have given the co-pilot the benefit of doubt and believed she had the ability to correct an approach that became unstable in the final few hundred feet of the approach. However, had there been any doubt, a GA should be executed

Accident investigation:

Investigating agency:  AAIB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration:  1 year and 4 months
Accident number: AAIB-27092
Download report: Final report
Language:  English

Classification:

Landing after unstabilized approach
Heavy landing
Runway mishap

Sources:

» AAIB

METAR Weather report:

02:20 UTC / 02:20 local time:
EGTE 190220Z 23010KT 9000 -RA SCT012 BKN040 12/10 Q1009=

Photos

Video, social media

Aircraft history

20 October 1994 N783AS Boeing first flight
1 December 1994 N783AS Alaska Airlines delivered
24 June 2009 VQ-BAO Aeroflot-Don registered
25 September 2009 VQ-BAO Donavia airline renamed
6 October 2015 2-VBAO Vx Capital Partners registered
February 2016 2-VBAO Vx Capital Partners Converted to freighter at Shanghai Pudong (PVG)
21 March 2016 G-JMCY West Atlantic UK registered

Map

This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line is connecting ADS-B datapoints from Flightradar24.
Distance from East Midlands Airport to Exeter Airport as the crow flies is 272 km (170 miles).
Accident location: Approximate; accuracy within a few kilometers.

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.

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Jetex Aims for 50 FBOs Worldwide by 2024 – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/jetex-aims-for-50-fbos-worldwide-by-2024-aviation-international-news/ Thu, 19 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526165

Jetex is moving forward with global expansion as it eyes a new FBO at Nice, France’s second-largest executive airport, and hopes for a swift cessation of hostilities in Ukraine so that it can put its FBO there back into operation.

“Jetex will continue expanding outside North America after the slowdown during the health crisis,” company founder and CEO Adel Mardini told AIN. “I am confident that we will have 50 FBOs by the end of 2024.” Today, Jetex has three operational centers—in Dubai, Beijing, and Miami—and a global network of 35 FBOs—which it calls private terminals—and several ground-handling stations.

In France, it has bid on the FBO tender at Nice. “Nice is a gamechanger,” Mardini said. “With 36,000 movements per annum, it is a key destination. While Paris Le Bourget is the biggest business aviation airport in Europe, Nice comes second, and Farnborough third. In the U.S., Teterboro, with 90,000 movements, is largest, although it is mostly small jets—around 90 percent of them fly domestic short-haul.”

Jetex has a strong development pipeline that includes key global locations. “Nice is a top destination for many private jet travelers and we hope our application to establish the Jetex presence there, which would complement Jetex Paris Le Bourget, will be successful. The authorities will make their decision over the coming months and we hope to make an announcement soon.”

The company’s FBO network in France consists of 17 locations that are the result of cooperation with French airport operator EDEIS Group, for whom it promotes business aviation as strategic FBO partner. Now CEO of French airport developer Armys, Youssef Sabeh was CEO at EDEIS in 2017 when it entered into a co-branding agreement with Jetex.

“Business aviation in France is a promising sector and Jetex is a dynamic partner, always seeking out opportunities to expand its network,” Sabeh told AIN. “I would not be surprised to see new alliances and strategic partnerships take place in the future.”

Mardini confirmed that Jetex often seeks to establish a ground-handling presence in a country or airport, as a precursor to a later decision to establish an FBO. Latin America remains a key growth area, and Jetex recently established such operations in Ecuador and Peru. On April 19, the Latin American and Caribbean Air Transport Association (ALTA) announced that Jetex had joined as an affiliate member.

“Dubai was once a ground-handling station only,” Mardini explained. “It all depends on a particular destination. Sometimes we have to wait years for a tender. In other locations, like Marseille, we made an acquisition. Every single case is different. We had to wait nine years in Marseille.”

Le Bourget, where Jetex opened its first FBO, has long been a bellwether of the company’s progress. “France is a big opportunity for us,” he said. “The tremendous success of Jetex in Paris created awareness about our brand, and today we are present in key locations across France, including Marseille and Toulouse.”

According to Mardini, Le Bourget boasted the strongest FBO operators in the world—Signature Flight Support, Landmark Aviation, and Universal Weather and Aviation. ”We arrived in 2009 and by 2011 achieved a market share of almost 20 percent, which we kept growing ever since,” Mardini said.

“Last year, there were about 40,000 movements out of which Jetex Paris handled more than 12,000, a market share of 30 percent. We are grateful for the loyalty and trust of the major charter operators: VistaJet, NetJets, Global Jet, and TAG Aviation.”

Jetex has also seen strong numbers at its facility at the VIP terminal at Dubai Al Maktoum International Airport. “We are pleased with the results both in Paris and in Dubai. Last year, Jetex’s VIP terminal in Dubai saw more than 16,000 movements. We handled more than 10,800 flights, or 68 percent, which gave us the biggest market share in Dubai,” Mardini told AIN.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine led to a sudden lull in operations in Europe and surrounding areas, he said. “The start of the special operation was a shock to the market and a number of flights were disrupted,” he noted. “However, I believe that the market will soon stabilize and recover.”

Jetex’s Ukraine team is currently outside the country. “They left Kyiv and suspended operations for the time being,” according to Mardini. “We invested in the facility in Kyiv and it showed good results. Now we have lost that, but thankfully our team is safe. We all look forward to the peaceful settlement of the current operation. Oil is [over $100 a barrel], which affects the business.”

Mardini is also eyeing growth at Seletar Airport in Singapore, which appeared to be putting Covid behind it earlier this year. Jetex signed a deal in 2020 to open an FBO there in association with Bombardier.

“In 2021, the entire Asian market was grounded due to the health crisis,” Mardini said. “Jetex Singapore handled 6,500 flights, which was significantly above our original forecast of 4,000. After almost two years, Singapore is open to international travelers once again and we look forward to expanding our operations there.”

As usual, Jetex has a major presence this week at EBACE. “I never miss EBACE. It is a key event,” Mardini said.

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Atlantic Aviation’s Boca FBO To Get $40M Makeover – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/atlantic-aviations-boca-fbo-to-get-40m-makeover-aviation-international-news/ Thu, 19 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526161

Atlantic Aviation will make $40 million in improvements at its FBO at Florida’s Boca Raton Airport (KBCT) as part of a 40-year lease renewal it recently inked with the airport authority. Under the agreement announced Thursday, Atlantic Aviation will upgrade, enhance, and expand existing airport infrastructure at the location over the next seven years.

Planned upgrades to its 41-acre Boca Raton campus include building an additional 52,000 sq ft of hangar space and 12,000 sq ft of new shop/office space; repaving some 710,000 sq ft of existing ramp space and expanding that by another 50,000 sq ft; renovation of the executive terminal; and construction of a new 90,000-gallon fuel farm. These projects will boost Atlantic’s existing ramp and hangar capacity at Boca Raton, it said, especially in light of traffic at the FBO more than tripling since the beginning of the pandemic.

“Atlantic Aviation is committed to Boca Raton for the long haul and we’re proud to be participating in the city’s efforts to stimulate further economic development and attract new business,” said Atlantic Aviation COO Tim Bannon. “Our continued presence, coupled with these new facilities, will provide best-in-class service to visitors and everyone who proudly calls Boca Raton home.”

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Flexjet to Adopt GE Digital's Maintenance Insight Fleetwide – The Bakersfield Californian https://businessaviationnews.com/flexjet-to-adopt-ge-digitals-maintenance-insight-fleetwide-the-bakersfield-californian/ Wed, 18 May 2022 18:32:08 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=976668

CLEVELAND–(BUSINESS WIRE)–May 18, 2022–

Flexjet, the most exclusive global fractional private jet provider, also known for its high safety standards, today announced that it has adopted GE Digital’s Maintenance Insight software solution for its fleet operations. Maintenance Insight detects aircraft and component degradation before even scheduled maintenance would catch it.

The Maintenance Insight program also generates analytics that can be used to help optimize performance and decrease inefficiencies that lead to excess fuel burn and carbon emissions, allowing Flexjet to reduce its carbon footprint while operating the aircraft.

“We began using GE wireless flight data transmission across the Flexjet fleet in 2019 and are pleased to become the first to adopt this new maintenance innovation as well,” said Megan Wolf, Flexjet’s Chief Operating Officer. “Flexjet owns, operates and maintains our own aircraft, and Maintenance Insight’s powerful analytics will give our award-winning maintenance team even more tools to keep our aircraft in top shape.”

Maintenance Insight works by extracting full-flight data from each aircraft’s sensors, enabling Flexjet to proactively identify maintenance and reliability issues. By generating data from every flight, Flexjet is able to identify problems that otherwise might not be caught until scheduled routine maintenance, avoiding unplanned downtime. This also enables aircraft to be serviced at Flexjet maintenance stations rather than at third-party service stations, so-called “out-station events,” further reducing costs and delays.

“With the ability to also optimize performance and decrease fuel inefficiencies, this software will help us to maintain our industry leadership in this critical field, improving aircraft reliability and efficiency, protecting the natural environment and controlling operating and maintenance costs,” said Wolf.

Safety is the highest priority at Flexjet and goes hand in hand with aircraft maintenance. This announcement is one more in a long line of safety accolades and initiatives.

In 2021, Flexjet announced that it has achieved active conformance with the FAA’s Safety Management System (SMS). In earning this designation from the FAA, Flexjet has joined an elite group – only one percent of the nation’s private jet providers – to do so.

In addition to its 23-year streak as an FAA Diamond Award winner, Flexjet also holds the Aviation Research Group/US (ARG/US) Platinum Safety Rating, among the most esteemed aviation safety ratings. The biennial Platinum rating results from independent evaluations and a multi-day, onsite examination that compares companies against the industry’s leading practices for safety.

Flexjet also maintains IS-BAO compliance at level 2, based upon a global, voluntary code of best practices with a safety management system. IS-BAO conforms with the standards and practices of the International Civil Aviation Organization, and compliance is the same as meeting an international standard of safety excellence.

Flexjet also was the first fractional jet ownership program to meet the demanding Industry Audit Standard of the Air Charter Safety Foundation, perhaps the most demanding standard for Part 135, and remains on the registry. Flexjet also takes part in the FAA’s innovative Part 5 Safety Management System.

“A culture built around safety and service can never be stagnant,” added Wolf. “GE Digital’s Maintenance Insight is an innovative resource that will ensure we remain the most forward-looking provider of private jet travel, consistently at the forefront of aircraft safety, maintenance and Owner service.”

About Flexjet

Flexjet first entered the fractional jet ownership market in 1995. Flexjet offers fractional jet ownership and leasing. Flexjet’s fractional aircraft program is the first in the world to be recognized as achieving the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s Industry Audit Standard, is the first and only company to be honored with 23 FAA Diamond Awards for Excellence, upholds an ARG/US Platinum Safety Rating, a 4AIR Bronze Sustainable Rating and is IS-BAO compliant at Level 2. Flexjet’s fractional program fields an exclusive array of business aircraft—some of the youngest in the fractional jet industry, with an average age of approximately six years. In 2015, Flexjet introduced Red Label by Flexjet, which features the youngest fleet in the industry, flight crews dedicated to a single aircraft and the LXi Cabin Collection of interiors. To date there are more than 40 different interior designs across its fleet, which includes the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500, Bombardier Challenger 350, the Gulfstream G450 and G650. Flexjet’s European fleet includes the Embraer Legacy 500, Praetor 600. Flexjet is a member of the Directional Aviation family of companies. For more details on innovative programs and flexible offerings, visit www.flexjet.com or follow us on Twitter @Flexjet and on Instagram @FlexjetLLC.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220518006050/en/

CONTACT: Nicholas Parmelee

The Hubbell Group, Inc.

216-406-5602 (mobile)

781-878-8882 (office)

nparmelee@hubbellgroup.com

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA OHIO

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: DATA MANAGEMENT AIR TECHNOLOGY AEROSPACE TRANSPORT MANUFACTURING SOFTWARE

SOURCE: Flexjet

Copyright Business Wire 2022.

PUB: 05/18/2022 02:32 PM/DISC: 05/18/2022 02:32 PM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220518006050/en

  • Positive Cases Among Kern Residents: 245,061

  • Deaths: 2,427

  • Recovered and Presumed Recovered Residents: 240,679

  • Percentage of all cases that are unvaccinated: 76.54

  • Percentage of all hospitalizations that are unvaccinated: 83.55

  • Source: Kern County Public Health Services Department

Updated: 5/17/22

More Coronavirus coverage

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Flexjet to Adopt GE Digital's Maintenance Insight Fleetwide – Business Wire https://businessaviationnews.com/flexjet-to-adopt-ge-digitals-maintenance-insight-fleetwide-business-wire/ Wed, 18 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1508615

CLEVELAND–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Flexjet, the most exclusive global fractional private jet provider, also known for its high safety standards, today announced that it has adopted GE Digital’s Maintenance Insight software solution for its fleet operations. Maintenance Insight detects aircraft and component degradation before even scheduled maintenance would catch it.

The Maintenance Insight program also generates analytics that can be used to help optimize performance and decrease inefficiencies that lead to excess fuel burn and carbon emissions, allowing Flexjet to reduce its carbon footprint while operating the aircraft.

“We began using GE wireless flight data transmission across the Flexjet fleet in 2019 and are pleased to become the first to adopt this new maintenance innovation as well,” said Megan Wolf, Flexjet’s Chief Operating Officer. “Flexjet owns, operates and maintains our own aircraft, and Maintenance Insight’s powerful analytics will give our award-winning maintenance team even more tools to keep our aircraft in top shape.”

Maintenance Insight works by extracting full-flight data from each aircraft’s sensors, enabling Flexjet to proactively identify maintenance and reliability issues. By generating data from every flight, Flexjet is able to identify problems that otherwise might not be caught until scheduled routine maintenance, avoiding unplanned downtime. This also enables aircraft to be serviced at Flexjet maintenance stations rather than at third-party service stations, so-called “out-station events,” further reducing costs and delays.

“With the ability to also optimize performance and decrease fuel inefficiencies, this software will help us to maintain our industry leadership in this critical field, improving aircraft reliability and efficiency, protecting the natural environment and controlling operating and maintenance costs,” said Wolf.

Safety is the highest priority at Flexjet and goes hand in hand with aircraft maintenance. This announcement is one more in a long line of safety accolades and initiatives.

In 2021, Flexjet announced that it has achieved active conformance with the FAA’s Safety Management System (SMS). In earning this designation from the FAA, Flexjet has joined an elite group – only one percent of the nation’s private jet providers – to do so.

In addition to its 23-year streak as an FAA Diamond Award winner, Flexjet also holds the Aviation Research Group/US (ARG/US) Platinum Safety Rating, among the most esteemed aviation safety ratings. The biennial Platinum rating results from independent evaluations and a multi-day, onsite examination that compares companies against the industry’s leading practices for safety.

Flexjet also maintains IS-BAO compliance at level 2, based upon a global, voluntary code of best practices with a safety management system. IS-BAO conforms with the standards and practices of the International Civil Aviation Organization, and compliance is the same as meeting an international standard of safety excellence.

Flexjet also was the first fractional jet ownership program to meet the demanding Industry Audit Standard of the Air Charter Safety Foundation, perhaps the most demanding standard for Part 135, and remains on the registry. Flexjet also takes part in the FAA’s innovative Part 5 Safety Management System.

“A culture built around safety and service can never be stagnant,” added Wolf. “GE Digital’s Maintenance Insight is an innovative resource that will ensure we remain the most forward-looking provider of private jet travel, consistently at the forefront of aircraft safety, maintenance and Owner service.”

About Flexjet

Flexjet first entered the fractional jet ownership market in 1995. Flexjet offers fractional jet ownership and leasing. Flexjet’s fractional aircraft program is the first in the world to be recognized as achieving the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s Industry Audit Standard, is the first and only company to be honored with 23 FAA Diamond Awards for Excellence, upholds an ARG/US Platinum Safety Rating, a 4AIR Bronze Sustainable Rating and is IS-BAO compliant at Level 2. Flexjet’s fractional program fields an exclusive array of business aircraft—some of the youngest in the fractional jet industry, with an average age of approximately six years. In 2015, Flexjet introduced Red Label by Flexjet, which features the youngest fleet in the industry, flight crews dedicated to a single aircraft and the LXi Cabin Collection of interiors. To date there are more than 40 different interior designs across its fleet, which includes the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500, Bombardier Challenger 350, the Gulfstream G450 and G650. Flexjet’s European fleet includes the Embraer Legacy 500, Praetor 600. Flexjet is a member of the Directional Aviation family of companies. For more details on innovative programs and flexible offerings, visit www.flexjet.com or follow us on Twitter @Flexjet and on Instagram @FlexjetLLC.

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Flexjet Hosts Jet Owners at Miami's Hottest Ticket of The Year: Formula 1 Miami Grand Prix 2022 – Business Wire https://businessaviationnews.com/flexjet-hosts-jet-owners-at-miamis-hottest-ticket-of-the-year-formula-1-miami-grand-prix-2022-business-wire/ Thu, 05 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1517274

CLEVELAND–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Flexjet, a global leader in fractional private jet travel, will host its jet Owners at the Formula 1 Crypto.Com Miami Grand Prix at the Miami International Autodrome (MIA) May 6-8, 2022. Flexjet’s premium open-air, shaded observation lounges on the fastest corner of the MIA track will be among the exclusive Turn 5 Suites.

“More and more, we have seen jet Owners traveling to sporting events like this one, so offering hospitality to them at the Grand Prix was an inspired idea,” said Megan Wolf, Flexjet’s Chief Operating Officer.

Part of the allure of becoming a Flexjet aircraft Owner is Red Label by Flexjet, with the fractional jet brand’s flight crews assigned to a single, specific aircraft; custom cabin interiors and the most modern fleet. In addition, Flexjet offers access to unique and rewarding experiences with extraordinary events and hand-selected partners such as Worth Avenue Yachts, with which Flexjet partnered on this activation.

The Grand Prix suite, just across from Luxury Row on the race site, offers a trackside view of one of the most exciting fan perspectives on the speedway and is conveniently located near The Marina, West Campus and Fountain area.

The Miami Grand Prix and Formula 1 Racing

The Miami Grand Prix, with practices and qualifying runs on May 6-7 and the race itself on May 8, will be held on a 3.36-mile semipermanent track at the Autodrome on the grounds of Miami’s famed Hard Rock Stadium, home to the NFL’s Miami Dolphins team. The racecourse features 19 sizzling turns and three stunning straightaways that enable drivers to reach 200 MPH. The Miami International Autodrome has agreed to host the event for the next 10 years as part of the Formula 1 World Championship series.

The race in Miami is the fifth round of the F1 world championship and, joins Austin, Texas as one of only two F1 races in the United States this year. In 2023, another F1 round will debut in Las Vegas, bringing the total to three.

Inaugurated in 1950, Formula 1 racing has its origins in Europe’s legendary prewar grand prix races. Today’s Formula 1 is the top class for open-wheel, single-seater formula racecars, and it has the world’s fastest open-road racecars. Current teams are sponsored by such renowned automotive brands as Ferrari, Mercedes, McLaren, Alfa Romeo, Aston Martin and others. The Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), the governing body of motor sports worldwide, sanctions the championship series.

About Flexjet

Flexjet first entered the fractional jet ownership market in 1995. Flexjet offers fractional jet ownership and leasing. Flexjet’s fractional aircraft program is the first in the world to be recognized as achieving the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s Industry Audit Standard, is the first and only company to be honored with 23 FAA Diamond Awards for Excellence, upholds an ARG/US Platinum Safety Rating, a 4AIR Bronze Sustainable Rating and is IS-BAO compliant at Level 2. Flexjet’s fractional program fields an exclusive array of business aircraft—some of the youngest in the fractional jet industry, with an average age of approximately six years. In 2015, Flexjet introduced Red Label by Flexjet, which features the youngest fleet in the industry, flight crews dedicated to a single aircraft and the LXi Cabin Collection of interiors. To date there are more than 40 different interior designs across its fleet, which includes the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500, Bombardier Challenger 350, the Gulfstream G450 and G650. Flexjet’s European fleet includes the Embraer Legacy 500, Praetor 600. Flexjet is a member of the Directional Aviation family of companies. For more details on innovative programs and flexible offerings, visit www.flexjet.com or follow us on Twitter @Flexjet and on Instagram @FlexjetLLC.

]]>
Air France Boeing 777 pilots made dual control inputs during go-around, BEA says https://businessaviationnews.com/air-france-boeing-777-pilots-made-dual-control-inputs-during-go-around-bea-says/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 18:03:59 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=827487

Air France Flight AF011, a Boeing 777-300ER, suffered serious control issues during a go around at Paris-CDG Airport.
The captain on the flight was the Pilot Monitoring (PM), the co-pilot, in the right seat, was the Pilot Flying (PF).

During the descent, the crew prepared for an ILS approach to runway 26L. The meteorological conditions were the following: wind 230, 8 kt, visibility 3000 m, cloud ceiling 300 ft, temperature 9° C, QNH 1013.
On final, the aircraft was established on the localizer and glideslope ILS beams. At 07:49 UTC, the crew were cleared to land. They configured the aircraft for landing, the selected speed was 140 kt. The crew then carried out the Landing checklist. At 07:50:20, when the aircraft was at an altitude of 1670 ft, the PF continued the approach in manual flight: he disconnected the autopilot (AP), leaving the auto throttle (AT) and the flight directors (FD) activated. He then made inputs on the controls for around 15 seconds. The aircraft followed the movement of the controls and stayed on the ILS path, the left and right roll being less than 2°. In the subsequent ten seconds, there were less inputs on the wheel. The co-pilot than made inputs on the control column and wheel with a greater frequency, the amplitude was still small, the aircraft followed the commands, the left and right roll being less than 3°. At 07:51:06, the co-pilot expressed his astonishment with respect to the aircraft’s bank angle. The roll inputs were amplified and the average position of the wheel was at around 6° to the left. The aircraft turned left with a small bank angle. The captain voiced his surprise with respect to the deviation from the flight path.
At 07:51:12, when the aircraft was at an altitude of 1115 ft, banked 7° to the left, with the wheel oriented 16° to the left, the crew carried out a go-around. Up until the go-around, the flight path had remained within the operator’s stabilization criteria. The recorded parameters show that the two pilots then simultaneously made inputs on the controls.
In the following second, the position of the wheel reached a maximum value of 27° to the left. One second later, the roll reached a maximum value of 15° to the left and the nose-up attitude was 12°.
At 07:51:16, the captain commented that the plane was going left. The control columns were then desynchronized for 14 seconds due to opposing forces. The captain held the control column in a slightly nose-down position while the co-pilot made several, more pronounced, nose-up inputs. Two brief episodes of wheel desynchronization were also observed.
At 07:51:20, the go-around switches were pushed again increasing the thrust to the maximum thrust available.
At 07:51:23, the pitch reached a maximum value of 24°.
At 07:51:25, the co-pilot called out ‘Positive climb’ and retracted the landing gear. The configuration warning was displayed and the associated aural warning (siren) sounded because the landing gear was retracted while the flaps were still in the landing position.
The two pilots continued to simultaneously make inputs on the controls. The captain made more pronounced nose down inputs for a few seconds.
At 07:52:06, the captain was the sole person making inputs. The crew completed the go-around actions.
The crew analysed the situation without perceiving the antagonistic inputs made on the controls and the desynchronizations of the control channels. They considered that they could use the AP again and carry out a new approach.
The co-pilot became the PF again. The captain informed the controller that there had been a problem on the flight controls and asked to join the final for runway 27R. The approach and landing took place without further incident at 08:13 UTC.
No failure warning was activated during the occurrence. No anomaly was observed on the aircraft.

Weather reported about the incident time (0751Z):
LFPG 050800Z 24008KT 3000 BR BKN003 09/08 Q1013 TEMPO BKN002
LFPG 050730Z 23009KT 3000 -RA BR BKN003 09/08 Q1013 TEMPO BKN002
LFPG 050700Z 23008KT 3000 -RA BR BKN003 08/08 Q1013 TEMPO BKN002

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Flexjet Celebrates World Pilots' Day – Business Wire https://businessaviationnews.com/flexjet-celebrates-world-pilots-day-business-wire/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1517282

CLEVELAND–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Flexjet, the world’s most exclusive provider of fractional private jets, today paid tribute to the skill, commitment and professionalism of its pilots on World Pilots’ Day. Celebrated annually on April 26 for nearly a decade, World Pilots’ Day honors the men and women who keep passengers flying safely through the skies.

“We are proud to honor our pilots, who are on the front lines of carrying out our commitment to our jet Owners,” said Megan Wolf, Flexjet Chief Operating Officer. “Our pilots’ tireless devotion to duty and dedication to the highest standards of professional excellence are an example for all of us, and we salute them as we mark World Pilots’ Day.”

World Pilots’ Day originated through the efforts of the Turkish Association of Airline Pilots to honor Fesan Evrensev, Turkey’s first pilot, who made his inaugural flight on April 26, 1912. The International Federation of Air Line Pilots’ Associations proposed April 26 as a date to annually recognize the role of all pilots worldwide. Since World Pilots’ Day was first proposed, pilots’ associations, airlines and other aviation organizations globally have adopted it to honor pilots.

Flexjet currently employs more than 850 pilots to fly its fleet of nearly 200 aircraft that comprise the most modern fleet in the skies, including the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500; the Bombardier Challenger 350; and the Gulfstream G450 and G650. Fifty additional aircraft will enter by the end of 2022, and the company plans to hire an additional 350 pilots to fly its growing fleet.

“In our business at Flexjet, the pilots are a major component of our customer service,” said Joseph Salata, Flexjet Senior Vice President, Flight Operations, and a pilot himself. “Our pilots are some of the most seasoned professionals in the industry, and they also have the reputation of being the friendliest. Our (jet) Owners can always rely on our pilots to provide a safe and efficient flight, as well as an outstanding service experience. We are extremely proud of our Flexjet pilot force!”

Because of its combination of high earnings potential, modern aircraft and quality of life, Flexjet has become a highly attractive destination for pilots. Flexjet pilots have among the highest pay rates in aviation, enjoy additional bonus opportunities, extensive home-based crewing domiciles, schedule flexibility and the ability to upgrade their position in a little more than one year. In addition, Flexjet’s Domestic Red Label and International Large Cabin programs empower pilots to select the programs that are best for them personally and professionally.

Flexjet European operations Accountable Manager Clive Richardson, who also is a pilot, said, “What defines a professional pilot? Somebody who can go all the way in this career is somebody who is able to dedicate, focus and have that passion, patience and drive. The job pilots do, they are not just a machine pushing buttons on an airplane. We love pilots here. I’m one myself, and our chairman’s a pilot. This is a pilot’s company, and I think World Pilot’s Day will raise that profile.”

Flexjet is hiring 350 pilots this year and invites qualified pilots to apply by visiting https://www.flexjet.com/careers/pilots/.

About Flexjet

Flexjet first entered the fractional jet ownership market in 1995. Flexjet offers fractional jet ownership and leasing. Flexjet’s fractional aircraft program is the first in the world to be recognized as achieving the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s Industry Audit Standard, is the first and only company to be honored with 23 FAA Diamond Awards for Excellence, upholds an ARG/US Platinum Safety Rating, a 4AIR Bronze Sustainable Rating and is IS-BAO compliant at Level 2. Flexjet’s fractional program fields an exclusive array of business aircraft—some of the youngest in the fractional jet industry, with an average age of approximately six years. In 2015, Flexjet introduced Red Label by Flexjet, which features the youngest fleet in the industry, flight crews dedicated to a single aircraft and the LXi Cabin Collection of interiors. To date there are more than 40 different interior designs across its fleet, which includes the Embraer Phenom 300, Legacy 450 and Praetor 500, Bombardier Challenger 350, the Gulfstream G450 and G650. Flexjet’s European fleet includes the Embraer Legacy 500, Praetor 600. Flexjet is a member of the Directional Aviation family of companies. For more details on innovative programs and flexible offerings, visit www.flexjet.com or follow us on Twitter @Flexjet and on Instagram @FlexjetLLC.

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NetJets Europe Marks Milestone Jet Delivery – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/netjets-europe-marks-milestone-jet-delivery-aviation-international-news/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1520538

NetJets has taken delivery of the 100th aircraft for its European fleet—a milepost that comes as part of the fractional aircraft provider’s €2.2 billion ($2.36 billion) investment in its global fleet. The milestone aircraft is a midsize Cessna Citation Latitude, the delivery of which was marked with a celebration and water cannon salute in Cascais, Portugal.

“I am thrilled to be celebrating the further expansion of our European fleet with this latest aircraft delivery,” said NetJets Europe executive director Christian Luwisch. “NetJets is proud of its unwavering commitment to safety, service, and unmatched global access. This landmark achievement is a testament to all at NetJets continuing to deliver exceptional service and access to our owners.”

Globally, NetJets has more than 800 business jets in its fleet, ranging from the Embraer Phenom 300E light twin to the ultra-long-range Bombardier Global 7500. The company’s fleet investment calls for the addition of more than 130 business jets by the end of this year.

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EU adds 20 Russian airlines to EU Air Safety List https://businessaviationnews.com/eu-adds-20-russian-airlines-to-eu-air-safety-list/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 07:16:40 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=725183

The European Commission has updated the EU Air Safety List, which is the list of airlines that are subject to an operating ban or operational restrictions within the European Union, because they do not meet international safety standards.
Following the update, 21 airlines certified in Russia are now included on the EU Air Safety List. This reflects serious safety concerns due to Russia’s forced re-registration of foreign-owned aircraft, knowingly allowing their operation without valid certificates of airworthiness. This is in breach of international aviation safety standards.

  • Aeroflot – Russian Airlines
  • Alrosa Air Company
  • Aurora Airlines
  • Aviastar-TU
  • Ikar
  • Iraero Airlines
  • Izhavia
  • Nord Wind
  • Nordstar Airlines
  • Pobeda Airlines
  • Rossiya Airlines
  • Rusjet
  • Rusline
  • Siberia Airlines
  • Smartavia Airlines
  • Ural Airlines
  • Utair Aviation
  • Uvt Aero
  • Yakutia
  • Yakutia
  • Yamal Airlines
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https://businessaviationnews.com/544896-2/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 13:06:14 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=544896 <!– –>

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has released the final report from its investigation into a serious incident where a Malaysia Airlines Airbus A330 with 229 on board took off from Brisbane Airport with no airspeed information.
Shortly after the aircraft arrived in Brisbane from Kuala Lumpur on 18 July 2018, a support engineer placed covers on the aircraft’s three pitot probes (airspeed sensors) to prevent them from being blocked by mud wasps, a known hazard at Brisbane Airport.
However, during the turnaround and before the aircraft departed for the return flight to Kuala Lumpur the covers were not removed. This was despite there being requirements for multiple walk-around checks by the aircraft captain, engineer and dispatch coordinator, all intended to identify unsafe conditions such as the fitment of pitot probe covers.
Consequently, the aircraft’s primary instrument displays showed red speed flags in place of airspeed indications from early in the take-off, and the flight crew did not respond in time for the take-off to be safely aborted.
Once airborne the flight crew climbed the aircraft to 11,000 ft where they performed troubleshooting and other procedures, including shutting down the aircraft’s air data systems. This activated a system installed on some Airbus aircraft called the back up speed scale (BUSS), which displayed a safe flight envelope for flight crew to maintain.
Using the BUSS and airspeed management procedures, and assisted by air traffic control, the flight crew brought the aircraft safely back to Brisbane.

On the night, several individuals from different organisations had separate, key roles in detecting aircraft damage or other unsafe conditions such as the fitment of pitot probe covers. However, these checks were omitted entirely or only partially completed, for a variety of reasons including inadequate communication and reduced diligence.
Malaysia Airlines had recently reintroduced flights to Brisbane, and although the wasp risk was identified, the use of pitot probe covers was not required or controlled. Shortly after the occurrence, the ATSB issued a safety advisory notice (SAN) to operators who fly to Brisbane Airport to consider the use of pitot probe covers and, where they are used, ensure there are rigorous processes for confirming they are removed before flight.
The ATSB also uncovered a range of deeper issues, including coordination among the involved organisations, that allowed front-line problems to emerge.
For flight crew, the occurrence also highlights the importance of vigilance, communications, and decision-making in adverse circumstances.
The ATSB found that surprise, uncertainty, time pressure, and ineffective communication between the two pilots during the take-off probably led to stress and high cognitive workload. This reduced their capacity to interpret the situation and make a decision early enough to safely reject the take-off.

In response, the ATSB has issued a safety advisory notice (SAN) advising manufacturers and operators of all large transport aircraft to consider what types of unreliable airspeed events can occur, how the information is presented to pilots, and what responses are the safest in different phases of the take-off and in a range of potential situations.
All of the relevant organisations have contributed to the large number of safety actions taken in response to the incident and the ATSB’s investigation. For example, Malaysia Airlines now requires the placement of a placard on the flight deck as a visual alert that pitot probe covers are in place, and has introduced improvements to its change and risk management processes.
Airbus, meanwhile, has implemented additional flight crew training standards about unreliable airspeed on take-off, added guidance to the flight crew techniques manual on the importance of airspeed monitoring on take-off, and has commenced a review of airspeed indications in A330 and other aircraft types.
The ground handling and engineering companies involved in the incident have also made system and process improvements, and the airport information provided to pilots has been amended.

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NetJets to Purchase up to 150 Lilium eVTOLs – FLYING https://businessaviationnews.com/netjets-to-purchase-up-to-150-lilium-evtols-flying/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526112

Fractional aircraft ownership company NetJets has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to buy 150 electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) air taxis from Germany-based Lilium (NASDAQ: LILM).

Lilium, which is preparing to launch a flight test campaign of its fifth-generation eVTOL demonstrator Phoenix 2, announced the MOU with the Columbus, Ohio-based NetJets on Tuesday. NetJets also will run flight operations for a Lilium air taxi route network which is planned for Florida, the eVTOL company said.

“We are very excited to be working together with the world’s largest private jet company, NetJets,” said Lilium vice president of business Sebastien Borel. “The U.S. market will be a good test for us to see how far we can go. But it’s meant to be global, and we’re confident it will drive us to be global.”

The eVTOLs largely will be used to transport passengers during the first and last miles of their journeys, Borel said. “We’ve validated the demand,” he said. “And we feel confident it will be a great add to NetJets’ offering and the way they’re going to do it.”

Lilium expects to enter service in 2024 with piloted, six-passenger, battery-powered eVTOLs capable of cruise speeds around 151 knots (280 km/hr) with a range of 162 nm (300 km).

In 2020, Lilium announced plans to build an eVTOL vertiport in Orlando. Last year, it reached a $1 billion deal with Brazilian airline Azul, in which Lilium would operate and maintain the airline’s eVTOL fleet.

Refining the Aircraft’s Design

Lilium made the announcement during its Q4 2021 earnings update for investors, revealing new details about the development of its demonstrator. 

Engineers have refined and optimized the eVTOL’s design, which includes a wing-mounted ducted fan propulsion system. Thanks to a slightly larger and more powerful design, Lilium said it has cut the number of ducted fan motors from 36 to 30. 

[embedded content]

In addition to reducing the aircraft’s weight and complexity, Lilium CEO and founder Daniel Wiegand said it will improve the “aerodynamic balance between the main wings and the front wings,” creating “potential for lower material and maintenance cost.”

The changes will also reduce technical and certification risk, Wiegand said, as Lilium works on simultaneous approval tracks with both EASA and the FAA.

“There is no change in the engine design, no change in the technology, no change in the engine voltage,” Wiegand said “Also, what we’re doing is basically slightly scaling up the geometry of the engine. But with the same design and parts, the same propelled speeds, the same acoustic technologies.”

Lilim said it’s on track to add a second demonstrator aircraft—Phoenix 3—which is expected to begin test flights this summer at the ATLAS Flight Test Center in Villacarrillo, Spain, enabling Lilium to accelerate its flight testing campaign.

“We have as a target for this campaign in the next steps to do the full transition flight and then continue into high-speed flying,” Wiegand said. 

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EASA launches European Information Sharing and Cooperation Platform on Conflict Zones https://businessaviationnews.com/easa-launches-european-information-sharing-and-cooperation-platform-on-conflict-zones/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:10:53 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=457582

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) launched the European Information Sharing and Cooperation Platform on Conflict Zones, an initiative which ensures that participating EASA member states and their operators have easy access to the best information when planning flights near or over areas of conflict.

The aim of the Platform is to enable its members to carry out risk assessments and take decisions based on reliable and updated data. In addition, the exchange of information between experts is expected to enhance the confidence of those taking decisions regarding the operation of flights in conflict zone areas. EASA will ensure that the Platform remains a trusted environment and also moderate the content and discussions.

Access to the platform is granted by EASA only to authorised bodies. The platform is fully funded by EASA, meaning that is made available free of charge to eligible interested parties.

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NetJets Agrees To Buy and Operate 150 Lilium eVTOLs – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/netjets-agrees-to-buy-and-operate-150-lilium-evtols-aviation-international-news/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526116

Under a memorandum of understanding, fractional aircraft provider NetJets plans to add 150 Lilium eVTOLs to its fleet, Lilium revealed to investors this week. NetJets has secured purchase rights for Lilium’s six-passenger model, which could be operated in both the U.S. and Europe.

In a February 28 statement to investors, Germany-based Lilium said NetJets would operate the aircraft and might also become a flight operations partner for Lilium’s planned service network in Florida and other locations. According to Lilium, NetJets could potentially run Lilium’s services in Florida under its existing Part 135 air operator certificate. In November 2020, Lilium announced plans to provide eVTOL connections between larger cities in central and south Florida, built around a network of vertiports at locations such as the Lake Nona community near Orlando.

Lilium is aiming to certify its eVTOL and start commercial services in 2024. It has not said when it will start flight testing a preproduction prototype but has told investors it will release design data to its supply chain during the second quarter. The company is still flight testing a five-seat technology demonstrator of its ducted-fan, fixed-wing model.

Want more? You can find a longer version of this article at FutureFlight.aero, a news and information resource developed by AIN to provide objective coverage and analysis of cutting-edge aviation technology.

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Let L-410 burns out at Bukavu, DRC, after on board fire https://businessaviationnews.com/let-l-410-burns-out-at-bukavu-drc-after-on-board-fire/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 20:57:10 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=428290

Narrative:
A Let L-410UVP-E3, 9S-GFA, burnt out at Bukavu-Kavumu Airport, D.R. Congo.
The aircraft was carrying 1600 kgs of cargo bound for Lulingu, D.R. Congo. Local media reports suggest that a fire developed on board the aircraft after takeoff. The pilots reportedly returned to Kavumu Airport and evacuated from the aircraft.
The fire quickly engulfed the cabin of the aircraft and fire services were not able to contain the fire. The aircraft burned out completely.

Local media websites reported that the aircraft was operated by ‘Agefreco’. This company does not have an Air Operator Certificate (AOC) in D.R. Congo. Fleet lists suggest the aircraft was owned instead by Doren Air Congo.

Sources:

» radiookapi.net
» russianplanes.net
» Soviet Transports

Photos

Add your photo of this accident or aircraft

Video, social media

Map

This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Bukavu-Kavumu Airport to Lulingu Tshionka Airport as the crow flies is 139 km (87 miles).

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.

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People in Aviation – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/people-in-aviation-aviation-international-news/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526120

The FAA has named Billy Nolen, a former airline captain who most recently held a leadership role with WestJet Airlines in Canada, to serve as associate administrator of aviation safety. Previously v-p for safety, security, and quality for WestJet, Nolen brings considerable airline experience to the agency, including stints with Qantas Airways, American Airlines, and Airlines for America (A4A).

JetNet has named Greg Fell to lead the company in a newly created CEO position. Ownership of JetNet is remaining with the Esposito family, and Tony Esposito remains president, owner, and majority shareholder. Fell brings a 30-year background in senior management, including strategic development and IT infrastructure growth, across a number of industries to his new role. He has served as CEO for the social media company Display Social and as COO of Gama Aviation and held positions with Ford Motor Co. and Terex.

Nikolay Kolesov has been appointed director-general of Russian Helicopters. He succeeds Andrei Boginsky, who held this position since 2017 but has transferred to the United Aircraft Corporation as the deputy director-general for civil aviation and director-general of the Irkut Corporation. Kolesov had been the head of Concern Radio-Electronic Technologies since 2009.

Lilium has appointed Karim Jalbout chief people officer. Jalbout recently was a lead partner for private equity and technology at Egon Zehnder and also led global customer propositions and sales at Sony Ericsson Mobile.

Stevens Sainte-Rose has joined Wheels Up Experience as chief people officer. Sainte-Rose has human resources experience across a range of industries, previously as senior v-p of human resources at Coca-Cola Company International, chief human resources officer at U.S. Walgreens, chief human resources and transformation officer at Dawn Foods Global, and most recently, chief human resources officer at Parallel Inc.  

Gulfstream Aerospace has promoted Michael Swift to regional senior v-p for Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and the Indian subcontinent, succeeding Roger Sperry. Sperry is retiring after serving with Gulfstream for 20 years and in the business aviation industry for nearly 50, including positions with Cessna, Learjet, and Galaxy Aerospace. Swift joined Gulfstream in 2018 as a regional vice president of sales after holding aircraft financing positions with Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Textron Financial. In addition, Chad Beaulieu has been promoted to regional v-p of sales for the south-central U.S. He succeeds Sherman Griffith, who is retiring after 15 years with the company. Beaulieu previously was regional sales manager for the south-central region and has also served with business aviation companies such as Leviate Air Group, Dallas Jet International, and Starbase Jet. Meanwhile, Tim Wood has rejoined Gulfstream as regional sales manager for the Middle East, Africa, and the Indian subcontinent. Previously with the Royal Air Force, Wood served with Gama Aviation before originally joining Gulfstream in 2018.

Mente Group has named Jay Bushouse managing director for the Midwest region. Bushouse, a flight instructor and airline transport rated pilot with more than 4,500 flight hours, previously served as a sales director for Textron and also has been involved in sales and marketing, revenue management, and planning in the commercial real estate sector.

Jet Linx has promoted Scott Wilbanks to senior v-p of aircraft management sales. Wilbanks, who has 20 years of sales and business development experience, joined Jet Linx in 2014 in Atlanta as director of private jet card sales and most recently was v-p of regional aircraft management sales.

Linda Peters, who has managed exhibitor activities for NBAA’s conventions and other events, has retired after spending nearly 28 years with the association. Peters—who was responsible for exhibitor events surrounding the Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition and the European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition, in addition to other NBAA events—joined the association in 1994 after serving with the Helicopter Association International.

The Women in Aviation and Aerospace Charter (WIAAC) has appointed Victoria Foy as co-chair. She succeeds Jacqueline Sutton, who had served as co-chair since July 2020. Foy is executive v-p of Safran Seats and brings 15 years of senior leadership experience to her role at WIAAC.

The United States Helicopter Safety Team has named Karen Gattis—who is FAA Flight Standards acting deputy director for general aviation safety assurance—as the government co-chair. Gattis, a former colonel in the Army National Guard who served as the director joint chief of staff and Aviation Brigade commander, has served with the FAA for 17 years and previously was a division manager with oversight for 10 General Aviation offices with an emphasis on helicopter operations and air tour operations.

Four Corners Aviation has named its initial senior leadership team: Diana Schneider, v-p of client services; Ray Bennett, v-p of sales; Mike Jefcoat, v-p of operations; and Phil Leone, v-p of safety and security. Schneider, who joined Four Corners Aviation’s predecessor in 2019, began her aviation career as an accountant/controller in 2007 and has a financial, managerial, and organizational background through other industries as well. Bennett has 30 years of aviation sales experience, including management roles in the areas of avionics, fractional aircraft, aircraft manufacturing, parts distribution, and aircraft management. Jefcoat spent 18 years as an airline pilot, including with Delta Connection, and also has served as the chief pilot and director of operations for FlightWorks, a consultant with ATP Flight School, and an FAA-approved check airman on the Hawker 800 and Bombardier Challenger 300. Leone has 26 years of experience in the New York Air National Guard, where he served as an aircraft commander, instructor, and evaluator in the C-5A Galaxy, an aircraft commander in the C-17 Globemaster, and the chief of safety for the 105th Airlift Wing in Newburgh, New York.

JSSI has named David Caporali v-p of business development for Latin America. Caporali, who has 15 years of industry experience, previously was director of aircraft sales for Viking Air Limited and also has served with Lider Aviação, where he specialized in regional sales and distribution of Hawker Beechcraft products in Brazil and North America.

Assent Aeronautics has named Ricky Gioconda v-p of advertising and business development. Gioconda joins Assent from AvBuyer, where he was associate publisher.

MyGoFlight has added Mitch Biggs to its senior management team leading sales and business development. Biggs formerly was v-p of sales and marketing at Avidyne Corporation and has held senior sales positions with several national retailers.

The General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) has hired Alex Burkett as general counsel and director of safety and regulatory affairs. Burkett joins GAMA after serving as the staff director and special advisor on aviation for the U.S. House aviation subcommittee and also has served as director of regulatory compliance for United Airlines and as an attorney with the National Transportation Safety Board.

Jet East has hired Patrick Moylan as v-p of safety. A former air traffic controller with the U.S. Marine Corps, Moylan most recently was a senior associate at FBO Partners and also has served as senior director of health, safety, and environmental for Signature Flight Support and held several safety positions supporting the FAA’s Office of System Safety and NextGen.

Air Charter Service has appointed John Castellano as v-p of commercial sales. Castellano has 18 years of private aviation experience, having previously worked with companies including Jet Aviation, Private Jet Services, NetJets, and Marquis Jet.

Alastair Kiernan has joined 2Excel Charter as head of large aircraft sales for the company’s charter division. Kiernan has almost three decades of aviation experience and formerly served as business development director for Titan Airways.

Savback Helicopters has named Stephen Mitchell head of sales for the UK and Ireland. Mitchell, who served in the Royal Air Force, brings 25 years of civil aviation sales experience to his new role, including with Sloane Helicopters, Auro Aviation, and JetBrokers.

Giuliano Donadio has joined Traxxall as regional sales director for Latin America, including Mexico, seven other Central American countries, and 12 South American countries. Giuliano previously spent seven years in aircraft services sales in Sao Paulo, Brazil, most recently as an aircraft sales manager focused on Cessna Citation aircraft for TAM Executive Aviation.

Jet Linx has named R. David (RD) Johnson director of safety. Johnson formerly was director of safety management systems for Global Flight Test and Delivery Group and has experience in flight operations, technical ops, employee development, process improvement, and safety management across the military, commercial, and general aviation sectors. He spent 31 years as a command pilot with the U.S. Air Force.

Sun Air Jets has appointed James Evans director of safety and FBO operations. Evans has held multiple roles within the operational management divisions at Southwest Airlines, including overseeing quality assurance/quality control, safety, recordkeeping, and compliance before transitioning to business aviation.

Jonathan Sharp-Fisher has been appointed business development director for Aerogility. Sharp-Fisher has 20 years of aerospace experience, including with Raytheon UK and BAE Systems.

Randy Miller has moved into the new role of manager of the paint shop at Duncan Aviation’s facility in Battle Creek, Michigan. Miller spent eight years as a maintenance technician for Duncan Aviation and previously served in the automotive field.

Gianfranco Sottotetti has joined Blueberry Aviation’s commercial team. Sottotetti has a background in engines, fixed-wing and rotary aircraft, and unmanned aerial vehicles, and has held sales and management positions at Piaggio Aviation, Rolls-Royce, and Leonardo.

West Star Aviation has promoted Chuck Conway to avionics supervisor at its East Alton, Illinois facility (ALN). Conway has more than 13 years of avionics experience. He began as a technician with the U.S. Marine Corps, held various technician roles with companies such as Flying Colours and Aero Charter, and joined West Star as an avionics maintenance lead last year. In addition, West Star has promoted Jake Zimmerman to Falcon avionics supervisor at ALN. Zimmerman has served with West Star since 2015 and has held a lead avionics position since 2017.

Duncan Aviation has named Rick Conner as a technical representative, working directly with aircraft operators who call with technical or troubleshooting questions. Conner has more than 38 years of avionics experience, including 33 with Duncan Aviation’s avionics and instruments repair facility as a technician, radar team leader, and most recently a customer account rep.

Melissa Raddatz has joined Pro Star Aviation as sales manager for the Great Lakes region. Raddatz, who has more than a decade of aviation experience and serves on several NBAA committees, has been a line maintenance technician for Gulfstream, a program coordinator for the National Association of Flight Instructors, an avionics installation technician for Duncan Aviation, and most recently, a regional sales manager for Flying Colours.

Jacqui Gunn has joined the Experimental Aircraft Association events team as a senior coordinator. Gunn most recently served as restaurant and events manager for the Holiday Inn in Appleton, Wisconsin.

West Star Aviation has promoted John Sonsoucie to project manager at its East Alton, Illinois facility. A U.S. Navy veteran, Sonsoucie joined West Star in 2014 as an avionics supervisor.

Final Flight

Charles Schneider, a software engineer who co-founded MyGoFlight in 2010, died December 17 after being in an aircraft crash the previous day near McGhee Tyson Airport in Knoxville, Tennessee, the company confirmed on a Facebook post.

Schneider, who served as CEO of MyGoFlight, had been traveling on business in a Cirrus SR22 piston single when the aircraft crashed at 9:20 a.m. on December 16, the company said, adding that the cause of the accident is unknown. According to the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), the CAPS ballistic parachute was deployed, but the aircraft was destroyed in the accident. MyGoFlight posted on December 17 that Schneider had died that morning at UT Medical Center in Nashville. Another occupant onboard the aircraft survived but was injured, AOPA added.

Schneider—who had a background that included leadership roles at companies such as Booz Allen & Hamilton, Oracle, MDC Holdings, and Builder Sourcing—founded MyGoFlight after obtaining his pilot license and deciding he did not want to use paper charts, the company said. Instead, he decided to use a computer but had difficulty keeping it on his lap. Shifting to an iPad, he determined a need to secure it and, MyGoFlight said, “Our first product, the iPad Kneeboard, received so much attention and demand, a business was born.”

That business has since expanded to include numerous mounts, cases, cradles, flight bags, luggage, anti-glare glass, and the first certified head-up display for general aviation.

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U.S. Fatal Bizav Accidents Double in 2021 | Business Aviation News – Aviation International News https://businessaviationnews.com/u-s-fatal-bizav-accidents-double-in-2021-business-aviation-news-aviation-international-news/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://businessaviationnews.com/?p=1526124 U.S.-registered business jets and turboprops, which flew significantly more in 2021 than in 2020, also experienced more fatal accidents last year. According to preliminary figures compiled by AIN, business turbine airplanes suffered 16 fatal crashes in 2021, double the number recorded in 2020. What’s more, fatalities from last year’s accidents increased nearly 62 percent, from 18 passengers and crew killed in 2020 to 46 in 2021.

Twenty-three people were killed in six crashes of N-numbered business jets last year, compared with four in a single accident in 2020. All six of the fatal bizjet accidents in 2021 occurred during Part 91 flights.The single fatal crash in 2020 was the February 8 in-flight breakup of a Cessna Citation 501 in which the two pilots and two passengers died. The NTSB reports that the Citation broke up while climbing through 15,400 to 16,000 feet after its pilots reported “problems” with the autopilot and the left-side attitude indicator. The twin jet, whose rated pilot was flying from the right seat, was on a Part 91 personal flight in day IMC and had filed an IFR flight plan. This accident remains under investigation.

The six U.S.-registered business jet accidents and fatalities (shown in parenthesis) last year were: January 9, Cessna Citation V (one); May 4, Gulfstream IV in the Dominican Republic (one); May 29, Citation 501 (seven); July 26, Bombardier Challenger 605 (six); September 2,  Citation XLS (four); and the Part 135 crash on December 27 of a Bombardier Learjet 35A (four). Investigation of all these accidents remains in the preliminary phase. Not included in AIN‘s analysis is the October 5 crash of a cargo Dassault Falcon 20 in which the two crew lost their lives.

Non-fatal mishaps of N-numbered business jets increased from 13 in 2020 to 19 last year. Reportable incidents ticked up from 65 to 69 year over year, including two involving aircraft manufacturers. There were no official reports of accidents or incidents involving operations under Part 91K, although several incidents involved fractional aircraft being flown under Part 135.

Instances of non-fatal accidents by U.S.-registered turboprops totaled 18 in both 2021 and 2020. However, fatal accidents increased nearly 30 percent year over year: seven accidents took the lives of 17 people in 2020 versus 10 crashes and 23 fatalities last year (the same number who perished in U.S. jet accidents in 2021). Updated information shows that all fatal N-numbered turboprop accidents occurred under Part 91 or its equivalent. 

The fatal accidents of N-numbered turboprops last year were: February 7, Cessna Conquest (two fatalities); April 23, Swearingen SA226 (two); May 5, Mitsubishi MU-2 (three plus one on the ground); July 10, Beechcraft King Air C90 (two); July 18, C90 in Mexico (three); August 20, Daher TBM 700 (one); September 28, Rockwell 690 (three); October 8, Cessna Turbine P210 (four); November 15, King Air E90 (two); and December 10, Piper Meridian (one). Not shown in our charts or narrative is the December 10 crash of a cargo SA226 that killed one crewmember.

In 2021, two non-U.S. business jets had fatal accidents that claimed 10 lives compared with four accidents causing 14 fatalities in 2020. On April 20, the co-pilot died in the crash of a Learjet 35A in Brazil while undergoing a flight test or training. On December 15, all nine occupants died in the crash of a chartered GIV in the Dominican Republic. Fatal accidents involving non-U.S. registered turboprops quadrupled from two to eight, year over year, and the number of fatalities rocketed from nine in 2020 to 40 in 2021. 

AIN‘s charts and narrative do not include mishaps involving solely cargo or military operations, illegal flights, shootdowns, or intentional crashes.

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